Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP James L. Holly, M.D. Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP


Letters - Retirement Notice and Responses
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Table of Contents
Response to Dr. Holly's Retirement Announcement

This is a partial table of contents to the responses to my retirement.  In that the circumstances of my leaving SETMA were not by plan or by choice, Carolyn and I have struggled with the abrupt change in our future.  It has been particularly difficult for her, which causes me pain.

Nevertheless, it is my hope that the organization which will have the name of "SETMA," but which will be something very different, will prosper for the sake of hundreds of people about whom I deeply care.

As Carolyn and I grieve and work through depression brought on by these events, we have had to depend upon our assessments and that of those who have expressed their judgement in writing.  Those assessments make up this document.

One comment sent to me stated, "I can think of no one who has had more of an impact on Southeast Texas medicine than you. You have touched many lives, directly and indirectly...and that includes a former young medical student in 1978.  When God welcomes you to his permanent kingdom, he will most surely say, "Well done, my son, well done indeed'. I can only echo that Larry.  Congratulations my dear friend!"  (Author not named, permission not sought)

The following 183 comments about my resignation have been comforting to us, and thus I have organized them so that when doubts creep into our thoughts, we can remember that there are those who do remember, who do care and who do appreciate our lives.

The following are the page numbers and comment numbers of significant parts of this document.  There are several comments accented in "red" which are particularly important in our judgment.

Announcement of Retirement

Karli Bourque

Elizabeth Pannill, daughter of School of Medicine Dean, my mentor

Two NextGen Executives -- SETMA's EMR vendor

College Station Healthcare Executive

Visitor from China

Carlos Jaen, Holly Distinguished Chair Patient-Centered Medical Home

Visitor from Australia

Founding Professor from UT Health School of Medicine

President, UT Health San Antonio

Beaumont City Councilman

Leader of the Chinse Delegation

Leigh Parker and Atticus

Scott Anthony

Ted Carpenter

Fifty Years of Memories

My Valedictory Address and the Announcement of my Retirement

Debbie Morrell

Ross Shauberger

Retirement Response Mark Toups

Valedictory - James L. Holly, MD

A difficult heart wrenching task - James L. Holly, MD

Theresa Bailey

Marvin Forland, MD

DR. CHRIS MAGGIO, President, Northwestern State University

A worthy reflection at the end of my career by Joe Bill Holland, MD

Doug & Judy Tomplait

Dana Melancon

Reverend John Davis

John Vardiman

Final Draft of Dr. Holly's Address on November 29, 2018 at Retirement Dinner

Last Patient Mr. Hill

Mrs. Kris Doyle’s watercolors lord and our gift

Rebecca Andrews Dr Holly’s Nurse’s Address

Retirement Dinner Master of Ceremonies

John Vardiman

Mrs Faisal Anwar (wife of Syed Anwar, MD, SETMA Partner)

The Citadel and Dr Henrich’s Address at Retirement Dinner

Chris Ingram, Cardiologist, Natchitoches, Louisiana

Richard Smith

Rubén Rangel

Joe Bill Holland, MD

Dr. Holly’s Final Note to SETMA Staff

Addendum to Final Note

Responses to Dr. Holly's Final Note to SETMA Staff December 21, 2018

Marcella Wheeler

Scott Anthony

Mr Holland’s Opus - What is the music if your life?

Presentation copy of Dr Bill Henrich’s Address at the Dr and Mrs James L. Holly Retirement Dinner, November 29, 2018

Serwat Perwaiz, July 22, 2019

From Serwat Perwaiz to Mrs Holly

From Serwat Perwaiz to Larry & Carolyn Holly

Carolyn Holly’s Response to Serwat



James L. Holly, MD Announces his Retirement September 27, 2018 Index

It is with sadness and regret that I announce my retirement from Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP and from the practice of medicine in Southeast Texas, effective December 31, 2018.

November 4, 2018, I turn 75 years-of-age.  When asked I have always assured others that I intend to work until I was eighty.  That was my intent, but circumstances prevent that from happening.  Over the past three years, SETMA has experienced economic pressures caused by Health and Human Services' (HHS) CMS's reduction over the past seven years of the reimbursement for Medicare Advantage by twenty-eight percent, aggravated by the Affordable Care Act tax on the funds paid to the HMO, which tax cost the IPA in which SETMA participates, $1,700,000 annually.  

A principle of organizational life is that when change is made, the most constructive thing old leadership can do is to step aside and wish the new leaders the best.  This I do.  SETMA is well prepared to proceed into the future, true to its values and aware of the challenges which need to be faced.

I am very proud of SETMA.   I am proud of the decisions we made and how we have conducted our practice.  SETMA has done things which no one has ever done and the things we have done which others are now doing, we did before almost anyone.  We have also cared for the most vulnerable and needy people in our community.  I am proud of that.  The partners of SETMA even funded a Foundation which helps provide care for patients.

As I write these words my mind races across the past forty-three years.   Mental images appear of thousands of individuals whom I have cared for, worked with, or known.  I wish I could begin naming them, some living, some long since gone, but all cherished in memory.  HIPPA and the inevitability of omitting important people makes it impossible to name names.

These years have been rich and rewarding.  There are many things which I know I could or should have done better, but where I failed it was never for want of trying.  I am comforted and challenged by the words of President Theodore Roosevelt who said:

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.  The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually try to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat."  Theodore Roosevelt, "Citizens in a Republic," the Sorbonne, Paris, France, April 23, 1910, quoted in The Man in the Arena, ed. John Allen Gable (Oyster Books, N.Y, Theodore Roosevelt Association, 1987), p. 54)

There is not a community in which I would rather have spent my career than in Beaumont, Texas and the Golden Triangle.  As a young man and wife with two young children, two dogs and a cat, my family arrived in Beaumont in 1975.  And, now forty-three years later, at the end of a long career, we do not think of "moving" to a retirement center but we look forward to spend all of our coming years doing what we have always done in a different venue but in Beaumont.  We look forward to the adventure of realizing who we are in a new arena.  And when our time is done, our resting place will be in Beaumont, Texas.

Due to the circumstances of my retirement, I will not have the option of practicing medicine in Southeast Texas, at least not for the next five years, but I can continue to perform my most important roles which are to practice my faith in Jesus Christ, to perform my vows to my wife of fifty-three years, Carolyn Ann Bellue Holly, to love my children and grandchildren and to reintroduce myself to the health and wellness center.  I do not fear for my well-being there, but I am anxious for the Center's staff's emotional stability when I appear.

As I try to put this announcement in context, I recall that in 2008, Carolyn and I were in England when we lost an extremely valuable object.  The manager of the Connaught asked, "Dr. Holly, you don't seem to be very upset about this?"  I responded, "Oh, I am disappointed but that object can be replaced, or it can be lived without; if I had lost my wife that would be something to be devastated over."  

And, so it is now, as I make this transition, it is disappointing to me and I suspect it will be to others that I am retiring, yet to be "fair and balanced," there may be some who sigh and think, "I'm glad that's over."  But, the reality is that what is fundamentally and ultimately important in my life is not changing.  As a result, while my heart is heavy, my face is smiling and my mind rushes about imagining the future.

The reality is also that the name SETMA will continue, the management will not change significantly, the care available will continue to improve and it will still be a very good place to work and to perform the act of "health caring" for others.  Change is always stressful, but if we take a deep breath and believe in who we are, "this too shall pass."  
The closest biblical reference to such an affirmation is II Corinthians 4:17-18 which states:  "For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory;  While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal."

It is my hope and expectation that all of the staff and professionals in SETMA will remain and will be committed to the same values and standards which have been our credo for the past twenty-three years, all will find a new iteration of who and what they are in this great community and practice.

And so, I bid you adieu which in its origin meant "to God."  It is not good-bye as each of you will always be a part of our lives and hopefully we of yours.  We will be as close as our prayers, our memories and our hopes and dreams.  God bless each one of you.

James L. Holly, M.D.
CEO, SETMA

Adjunct Professor
Department of Family and Community Medicine
UT Health San Antonio
Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine 

Associate Professor
Department of Internal Medicine
Texas A&M University
School of Medicine

  1. Bob Nix - "Larry, well deserved my friend! Godspeed."
  1. Karli Bourque - "Dr. Holly you are an amazing person and I am so honored to have met you. Thank you for everything you do! I truly hope you have a wonderful retirement and get to make amazing memories with your family and friends. I feel blessed to have had you as my doctor. Thank you!😊😇🙏🏻❤️�
Index
  1. James L. Holly - "We are still going to take you and your husband to dinner."

  2. Lana Hampton Morris -- "Congratulations, James!!!!!!!You need to spend more time with your wife and family."

  3. Julee Doiron - "Larry - congratulations!!  I remember when you and Carolyn were just starting out - You must realize how fortunate you are that you had such a long and fulfilling journey with your career.  AND - you're getting out while you're still young enough to get out and have some fun with your new freedom!  Happy for you!!"

  4. David Stone - "thank you for all that you have done in the way of medical care for me and my family. Thank you even more for your spiritual guidance and wisdom shared with me, which I believe will continue."

  5. Janice Lambert Hebert - "Larry, this was absolutely beautifully written. So glad you shared it. I know you will enjoy your time with family and friends. Love to you all!"

  6. Fred Patterson - "Best Wishes on Your Retirement!!  Now on to the "other" important stuff!"

  7. Willie Dell.  Weaver Boswell - "You are amazing. I will always remember your kindness to me when I asked you to see my late husband, Paul. Enjoy your retirement! Southeast Texas is losing an excellent and caring doctor."

  8. Gayle A Griffin - "I'm sure going to miss you. Have a blessed, wonderful retirement."

  9. Mark Douglas Fittz - "Thank you for your years of service to the people in Southeast Texas and beyond! What a blessing SETMA is to the various communities it serves. I am humbled by your consistent care and attention to our family through so many situations.  You have always been there for us. Thank you Larry!"

  10. Delores Mayeaux Nail - "Congratulations Larry. In a few months you'll wonder how did I ever have time to work. I know you & Carolyn will stay busy & active. Enjoy every minute.  Ya'll deserve these golden years."

  11. Inez Cagle - "Dr. Holly, Charles Cagle said tell you that he knows that Bill and Irene are so very proud of you.  We both know what a wonderful medical career you have had and I'm sure it isn't over yet.  Enjoy your time with Carolyn and your family now  but you may be like Charles who at 89 yrs. still works hard at the computer and is still doing some work he has loved for many years.  He never retired - just changed locations!!  You write well and we have enjoyed hearing from you but I had tears in my eyes as I read between the lines of what you wrote.  God Bless you and Carolyn in every way in the future.  You have enjoyed many wonderful years as a MD.  Your talent will just change locations as well."

  12. James L. Holly - "You are a delightful connection for me to my mother and father."

  13. James L. Holly - "Does he do genealogy?"
  1. Elizabeth Pannill - "Congratulations and best wishes for the future . Just another chapter where you will continue to make a difference for many."
Index
  1. James L. Holly - "All I have ever wanted to be is to be an honor to your father."

  2. Jerry P. Abraham - "Dr. James L. Holly, now you can come take a vacation in Southern California!  Hope you and Mrs. Carolyn Holly can make it out to Los Angeles at some point, ! would love to visit with you in East Texas soon as well.  Love,  jj"

  3. James L. Holly - "You are and always will be one of ours. We love you."

    Jerry P. Abraham - "Dr. James L. Holly and Mrs. Carolyn Holly, I love you both very much. These first few years out of residency have been very tough...but doing my utmost best to get through the healthcare challenges we're facing, ji"

  4. Carolyn Holly - "Good to hear from you, Jerry!  Friends are dear at this time for us."

  5. Paula Page Davis - "Our very best to you Larry...I shared this with your friend John."

  6. Gay Dale Ferguson - "Josh and I are very happy for you!  We will miss you greatly. Josh loves you SO much. He asks to see you all the time and is actually looking forward to come in for his flu shot. Lol. Hopefully you can help us find a new doctor Josh will like."

  7. James L. Holly - "Josh is one of the reason's i regret retiring."

  8. Tommie Whatley - "Congrats on your retirement!"

  9. Kristi Mean Dunn - "Thank you Dr. Holly!!!  You so totally rock dude!!"

  10. Irene Cardenas - "Enjoy this fall season of your productive life."

  11. Jim Carson - "Enjoy your retirement!!👍"

  12. Manuel Mendoza, Sr. - "I will always be part of SETMA till I reach 70 years. I'm 67 now and will always support the laboratory activities where I work. Thanks for the opportunity you've given me and will always be proud of whatever we do. Congratulations and God Bless you and your family."

  13. Stacie Warren Clark - "This makes me so sad - I loved working for/ with you - I was there from the get go,  few months after setma first opened - you have done amazing things - I am privileged to say I was able to be a part of what you built"

  14. Felicia Gonzales - "Congratulations, Doc!  Now you guys can come visit us at the lake!"
  1. James Muir - "You are an inspiration James L. Holly.  It is an honor to know you."
Index
  1. Scott Irwin - "Dr Holly, You will always be synonymous with SETMA and Leadership- both within SETMA, in healthcare, and life. Continued success in your next chapter.
    Thanks for being Dr. Holly!"

  2. Fran Bellue Mullins - "Congratulations You have been a Good & Faithful Servant!!! I couldn't be more happier for you and Caddy.  Wishing you both the best as you enter this new chapter in your life."

  3. Mary Beth Rose - "Congrats Doc! God bless you!!!"

  4. Michelle Satchfield - "Best Wishes!  It was my pleasure to be a part of the SETMA family and I continue to be grateful to you for that opportunity."

  5. Sandra Chippewa Martin - "Thank you so much for everything you and Carolyn have done for my family... best wishes on your retirement, we ♥️� you both!!"

  6. Sandra Pierson Smith - "Just cried. It won't be the same without you. Our family will always be thankful to you and yours for all that you have done for us and what you mean to us. I am happy for you to be able to retire and enjoy your beautiful wife even more. You are in my prayers."
  1. Hospital administrator - College Station - "You are a legend and I am so glad I had the opportunity to benefit from working with you.  I often speak of you and SETMA as the true model for medicine."
Index
  1. An Employee - "Dr Holly my heart is so very heavy!! I have been so very blessed to work for a godly man who started and founded this practice on that faith!! I know I did not talk to you daily but I always knew I was welcome and that I could ask for guidance and even prayer !!

    "I have learned so much working for the group of people you have brought together over the years. I'm going to miss food flying at my head at Christmas parties !!! I know changes forces growth. And that is what our Lord wants for us to grow in wisdom but to never loss integrity always stay humble and to love others especially the ones that don't love us. Thank you for standing for your faith and being the man of God called and created you to be! I and my family bless you and yours and we would love to have dinner occasionally with you and Carolyn."

  2. David Slaughter - "It has been a pleasure working with you and I will always appreciate the support you've given me."

  3. Doug Vaughn - "Doctor Holly, as you will I have already done, retired that is.  Thank you for being my first Response to Retirement."

  4. Keith Carter - "Ohhhh Larry - I am so so sorry to read of your upcoming retirement. You were, and remain, a wonderful man & thoughtful physician.  You will be truly, sorely missed.  Blessings, Keith "

  5. DOUG Vaughn - "doctor in Beaumont and ministering to me and my family all these years.  Never ever will I forget the introduction from you to the Holy Spirit.  As I reflect, what a chance you took but of course you had an unction that morning and I was prepared to receive.  Thanks for your obedience and impact on my life.  God bless as you begin this new journey."

  6. Jerry Jordan - "Hope to still see you around from time to time. Enjoy your retirement."

  7. Nancy Singleton Williams - "Wish I could think of something to say. Guess I really never thought you would retire. Please tell me the coffee pot will still remain on.😿"

  8. Felecia Caywood Colton -- I am very proud for you, yet selfishly sad to lose such a fine Doctor for our area.  I wish you and Mrs. Holly many, we deserved, years of retirement!"

  9. James L. Holly - "I remember the day I hired you."            Michelle Satchfield - "Me too!  😊  I didn't know then how much I would learn,  grow,  and be inspired.  I was looking for a job, but it was so much more.  Thank you.

  10. Kandi Kay Bellue Distefano - "Wow! I had no idea this was coming! Good for you! Congratulations! Love you!❤"

  11. Michelle Burch -- "Best wishes for you Dr. Holly, I learned so much working at SETMA and will cherish every moment when the day we went from paper to electronic records what a day that was."

  12. Carrie Holland Evans - "I was there and a part of that! Wow!!"

  13. Sherry A. Hilton - "Dr. Holly I hope you enjoy your retirement.  Just one question.  Who will become my doctor?"

  14. James L. HOLLY - "Several options."

  15. Gwen Johnson  -- "Dr. Holly, you worked in the Emergency Department at St. Elizabeth Hospital on the Night Shift. Remember? Of course you do! I remember you, for sure!

    "On a given night, during a slow period of time, I came into the ER as I was making Rounds "to see you doing "wheelies" in an ER wheelchair with the ER staff laughing & clapping!!!

    "The grin on the face of our newest ER Physician was priceless. It clearly lowered the bar taking you off the traditional pedestal on which we placed physicians. Even as we all laughed at your brashness, we in that moment accepted you in your silliness as the mark of your being a "good guy'! Thank you for being a great, caring, approachable physician. I appreciate you." Mrs Johnston, RN Retired Administrative Supervisor (MsJ)

  16. James L. Holly - "Friends, she has no video, fingerprints or corroborating witnesses. I deny everything. Smile. I do remember.  Do you remember the holes in the sheets?  Can't tell that one."

  17. Gwen Johnson - "James L. Holly shhhh"

  18. Ruth Wallace - "What is Carolyn going do with you at home all of the time?  LOL"

  19. James L. Holly - "Run!!!"

  20. Kevin Herrington - "It has been a pleasure knowing and working with you all these years. A true mentor, a needed disciplinarian with fatherly love at times, ALWAYS a friend in Christ. Your family is very dear to me.  Very happy for you and Mrs. Holly."
  1. Response from China to my retirement announcement - Of all the responses I have received since announcing my retirement eighteen hours ago, this one is the dearest.  Huang Yanli is a young Chinese woman, who has been to SETMA two times.  Her personal affection - she has always called me Grandpa - and her affirmation of SETMA's impact upon healthcare in Wuhou District, reassures me that it has all been worth it.  The following is her unaudited note 

    "On Aug 31, 2018, at 3:43 AM, ∞风猫∞  wrote:

    "Dear grandpa:  I was shocked when I saw your announces and very sad when I finished. At this moment I must tell you How I adore you, grandpa.

    "Under the guidance of your experience, primary medical transformation in wuhou district has achieved initial results. WONCA invited me to make an  speech at the conference in Seoul in October.  I would like to share the joy with you by email, but I did not expect to receive the news that you are planning to retire first. For SETMA, your persistence and guidance along the way have brought value to it, showing us how essential the primary care should be

    "As you hope, the spirit and method of SETMA's has landed in distant China. Our team is blessed with your generous guidance, and my team  will definitely stick to it. I hope to have the opportunity to visit you again in Beaumont in the next few years. Take care.  Your sincerely Shirley"

    ------------------ 原始邮件 ------------------
    发件人: "James L. Holly";
    发送时间: 2018年8月31日(星期五) 凌晨2:37
    收件人:   主题:

Index
  1. Thurman Bono - "wishing the best to both of you"

  2. Steve Flink -- Physician friend from Indiana (SF(
    "Larry, you told me that this was coming when we talked recently.  What an incredible impact you have had on health care not only locally, but nationally and internationally because of your leadership.  You are an amazing man!  Thank you for your wisdom and your generous sharing of what you know and learned.  We, in Hancock County, Indiana have benefitted from what you made freely available on your SETMA website.

    "Although you didn't choose to retire at this time we both know that God is sovereign.  The Lord has something else for you to do now.  I know you are not going to play golf 5 times a week and eat bonbons all day.  I imagine you will spend more time with your grandchildren.  May you continue to fulfill the purpose that the Lord has for your life.  Thank you for your friendship,  Steve"

  3. Pat McNeel - "Oh Dr. holly, I'm so surprised to hear this. You have been a great Dr. for us and I thought we would have you as long as we lived. I can't imagine not having you as our doctor, I don't know anyone as good as you are.

  4. Theresa Nix - "Dr Holly,  you are a life saver and life giver at every level.   The Bob Nix family will always hold you in high regard. We love and value you for your service and ministry.   Thank you"
  1. Carlos Jaen
    Dear Larry, thank you for your inspirational note and life example.  We have often talked about our mutual mentor Dr. F. Carter Pannill.  I know that he is smiling from above as he reviews how his medical student from his years in San Antonio has dramatically changed how primary care is seen and valued.  Your leadership and example inspire all of us in the Primary Care trenches, in our arena, to continue with our fight on behalf of the patients and communities we serve.  We learned from Dr. Pannill first-hand how to do primary care and how to practice with a team. 

    "In the same way, future generations will learn how to practice integrated, patient-centered, high-quality care from Larry Holly's legacy and SETMA's example.  Your generosity continues to influence our UT Health San Antonio deeply as we plan to receive our next Bellue-Holly Distinguished Visiting Professor, Dr. Jeannette South-Paul Chair of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Pittsburg.  Dr. South-Paul is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.  She will be in San Antonio the first week of October during Primary Care Week.

     More information to follow.  I hope that you and Carolyn can join us as we honor her parents and yours.  "Warm regards and my highest level of respect and admiration, Carlos

    Carlos Roberto Jaén, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.A.F.P.
    Professor and Chair of Family and Community Medicine
    James L. and Carolyn Bellue Holly Distinguished Chair, Patient-Centered Medical Home"

Index
  1. Peggy Pitman - "You deserve it.   It is the Medical Professions loss. You and Carolyn have certainly earned some free time to do as you please.  You will forever be our favorite PCP.  Best Wishes!"

  2. T. Bailey -- A note from an LVN who should be an MD - "Dt. Holly, I would like to thank You for all of the hard work and genuine love you have poured into SETMA.  I appreciate the faith and trust you have had in me over the last 18 years. 

    "As you recall I came to the "Evil Empire" with my friend Dr. John Vardiman.  I have grown tremendously, professionally and personally. I am truly at a loss for the right words.  I am saddened by this announcement but excited for your new ventures. 

    "The song that I requested played at my grandmother's funeral is now echoing in my head, although for a different reason, seems appropriate.  The is a song by Ray Boltz.   Although the song refers to our heavenly home, so much of it rings true in your leadership and life.   I just want to say THANK YOU for GIVING TO THE LORD.  Your generosity and love has had a positive impact on so many.  "Your Friend, Theresa,

    THANK YOU."

    I dreamed I went to heaven
    You were there with me
    We walked along the streets of gold
    Beside the crystal sea
    We heard the angels singing
    Then someone called your name
    You turned and saw a young man
    He was smiling as he came
    He said friend, you may not know me now
    But then he said but wait
    You used to teach my Sunday school
    When I was only eight
    Every week you would say a prayer
    Before the class would start
    One morning when you said that prayer
    I asked Jesus in my heart
    Thank you for giving to the Lord
    I am a life that was changed
    Thank you for giving to the Lord
    I am so glad you gave
    Then another man stood before you
    And said remember the time
    A missionary came to your church
    His pictures made you cry
    You didn't have much money
    But you gave it anyway
    Jesus took the gift you gave
    And that is why I'm here today
    Then another man stood before you
    And said remember the time
    A missionary came to your church
    His pictures made you cry
    You didn't have much money
    But you gave it anyway
    Jesus took the gift you gave
    And that's why I'm here today
    Thank you for giving to the Lord
    I am a life that was changed
    Thank you for giving to the Lord
    I am so glad you gave
    One by one they came,
    As far as the eye could see
    Each one somehow touched
    By your generosity
    Little things that you had done, sacrifices made
    Unnoticed on the earth, heaven now proclaims
    And I know up in heaven
    That you're not supposed to cry
    But I was almost sure
    There were tears in your eyes
    As Jesus took your hand
    And you stood before the Lord
    And He said my child look around you
    For great is your reward
    Thank you for giving to the Lord
    I am a life that was changed
    Thank you for giving to the Lord
    I am so glad you gave
    I am so glad you gave
    I am so glad you gave

  3. Jennifer Salyer -- From a missionary family in Africa

    "It occurred to me that y'all might not see me in the newsfeed often, so I've sent this privately. I posted it yesterday. We back home are all healthy and well, although I can feel the warfare quite keenly. I read about your retirement and am, on one hand, flabbergasted, and on the other hand not surprised at all, as all good things do come to an end. It did amuse me, though to hear Brad's voice echoing your sentiments about when Caddie's ring went missing. How many times have I lamented that something got lost in the mail (care packages) or that we otherwise "lost" something and Brad's response it, "IT DOESN"T MATTER! Those are just things! At least we have everybody still alive and well!" Many years under your tutelage....

    "Oh, there was one more funny thing that was said recently and after telling Brad, he said you would be amused. Bianca, who is 5 and every bit my mini-me, has ALWAYS loved the color pink. A few weeks ago, she told me that her favorite color is no longer pink, but blue. Obligingly, I asked why. She responded, "Cause there's more blue in the sky than Carter's got little pills!!!"
    "Sending love. I can't wait to tell Brad when he returns that you have finally decided to retire."
  1. Australia - - A note from Australia upon my retirement
    "Dear Larry. So delighted to have met you ... and to enjoy and be energized by that meeting.  Among your many epithets that have been so internalized that they seem like my own is "I have no problem being critiqued as less than excellent, I only have a problem if I don't do something about that'.

  2. "God bless you for your astonishing contributions ... let your retirement be nourished by how widespread they are.  I hope we meet again.  My regards. Michael"

    Michael Fasher. General Practitioner
    Adjunct Associate Professor University of Sydney
    Conjoint Associate Professor University of Western Sydney
Index
  1. Marvin Forland -- Note upon my retirement from one of my favorite Medical School Professors

    From: "Forland, Marvin".
    Date: August 31, 2018 at 10:16:57 AM CDT

    Subject: Retirement

    "Dear Larry,  as a veteran "retiree' let me extend my congratulations and appreciation to you. Our relationship began very early in your preparation for a career in medicine - indeed, almost fifty years ago, and it has indeed been a pleasure to see you fulfill so expansively all your early promise. Your highly successful efforts at SETMA, your ongoing community initiatives (which have spread internationally), and your continued loyalty and efforts on behalf of our shared institution reflect core values which I have greatly admired through these years.  (emphasis added)

    "My key suggestion for those approaching retirement comes from the Swiss physician Paul Tournier's book, "Learn to Grow Old' (1972).  He urges those preparing for retirement to plan ahead to assure stimulation from continued or new activities - these should be in place so that one does not retire from -  but retires to. I'm certain you already have many exciting activities planned.

    "With fond regards And all good wishes to you and Carolyn, Marvin

    Marvin Forland, M.D., M.A.C.P.
    Professor of Medicine Emeritus
    Center for Medical Humanities and Ethics
    Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine
    UT Health San Antonio
Index
  1. Peggy Lee -- From an associate with the IPA with which SETMA works upon my retirement 

    "Dr. Holly, thank You for sharing this with me.  My heart is heavy and sad.  Tears come to my eyes.  You have been the driving force of SETMA.  Although this is not what you had hoped for, perhaps you will find peace with it.  You are going to finally get more time with the family you love so dearly.

    "Whatever you decide to do going forward, I am sure that you will have the same dedication that you have had all these years of service to your patients and the community that you serve.  

    "I genuinely appreciate all that you have done and I too want great things to continue for the SETMA organization.  God has other plans for you now, Sincerely, your friend, Peggy"

  2. Kenny Eberhart - "What an outstanding contribution you have been blessed to dedicate yourself to the good of so many. I am one who has been fortunate to spend a season in your company. God has blessed me and my family in our friendship. Thanks now go with joy and many good years ahead."

  3. Glenn McNeel - "Appreciate your years of service to our family. Thanks also for bringing Doctor Michael Paul Thomas on board at SETMA. May God's riches be yours and your wife in this new venture."

  4. Judy Derick - "Dr.  Holly have wonderful retirement.  I am sure you and Carolyn have earn time to do the fun things this life has to offer.  Your faith in Jesus Christ has always been special  to me. So glad for a Brother and Sister in Christ. God bless and keep you both."
  1. Bill Henrich,  UT Health San Antonio President - "Dear Larry, by Aristotle's definition of happiness, you should be the happiest person in the world:     You've given your life to something worthwhile, to the healing and care of others.  You've earned the chance to take a deep breath and take a look around.  I look forward to seeing more of you and Carolyn and know you will cherish the time with family and friends.   

    "It will be difficult to calibrate the magnitude of your contributions.  More than any numbers, you are an example of what physicians aspire to be: Caring, competent, creative and humble.  (emphasis added) I count myself fortunate our paths have crossed - what a lucky day that was for me.  Love to you and Carolyn.  Bill"

    Larry,   I love reading the heartfelt tributes and notes from so many of your colleagues and friends.      The central theme in them is the love they express for you and Carolyn, a sentiment Mary and I deeply share.   Moreover, these expressions of affection are completely sincere.   You and Carolyn are role models to all, sterling examples of how to live life.   Bless you both.   Your friend,  Bill
Index
  1. College Station Hospital Administrator --  "You are a legend and I am so glad I had the opportunity to benefit from working with you.  I often speak of you and SETMA as the true model for medicine."

  2. Michael Oz - "Sorry to hear...congratulations and best wishes..well done.."

  3. Charles and Alicia -- From a Pharmacist Colleague - "It is with much dismay that I read your post about your retirement.  Our professional practices started very close together.  Mine 1972.  I worked for others in order to be able to open my current independent practice in 1983. I hope to keep going with my one man show as long as I can. When you love and enjoy what you do, why retire?

    "I remember your ER days, and Drs. Fortney and English, and then the building of one of the premier medical practices in the US, with you at the helm. Alicia and I have felt so privileged to be part of the SETMA family for the last 9 years.  Thanks so much for what you have done to help and enrich our SE Texas Community.
    May God bless you and Carolyn and your family. Charles & Alicia"

  4. Chris Maggio. University President --  "Dr. Holly, Thank you for the email and I wish you the best in your retirement.  You have truly made an impact on your profession and mankind.  I know this is a tough decision for you, but please know that you certainly enhanced healthcare in southeast Texas over the past four decades.  I look forward to visiting with you soon in person to again let you know how much I appreciate your contributions to others. Sincerely, Chris:

  5. Ruth Berggren, Comment from UT Health Professor  -- "Painful for you and Carolyn I'm sure. But none of this can undo or erase the loving kindness and healing touch you have provided to your patients and community over these many years, nor the role modeling you have provided nor the contribution of your mode of health care delivery. You have much to be proud of and your community has greatly benefitted from your work." Ruth.

    "Dear Dr Holly, This letter took me by surprise, and considering the circumstances you described, it saddens me a great deal.  We here at the Center are grateful for the friendship and generous support you have shown us through the years, and we hope we will continue to see you at many of our upcoming events sponsored by the Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics.  Please give my very warmest regards to your lovely wife Carolyn.  With all my best wishes for a safe and happy Labor Day weekend. Ruth"

  6. Beaumont Hospital Admin - "Sad day for medicine in SE TX region; however a celebration of decades of accomplishments, innovations and successes, all accomplished honoring God's Word and Principles.  DP"
  1. Beaumont City Councilman -"Larry, Congratulations on building one of the finest groups in the USA!  We are fortunate to have had your leadership in our community!  I know that you and Carolyn will remain busy because neither of you can slow down!  Thanks again for all that you have done to make our city, state, and country better. All the best, W. L."
Index
  1. Pat Crawford - "Dr. Holly, I know that you are doing what you feel is best at this time taking all things into consideration.  I know that we will do the best we can to continue on without you but you must know that SETMA will never be the same.  You are SETMA.  Hopefully, we can continue the work that you began and make you proud.  I will miss you terribly. Pat."

  2. Texas A&M Medical School Professor - "Dr. Holly. just wanted to say thank you for your many years of selfless service and sacrifice.  You have made a difference in so many people and places.  God bless your new ministry as you now get more time to focus on your family and friends.   God Bless and GigEm. Kory. Texas A&M"

  3. Laurie Liebel - "Dr. Holly, I had to take a moment to process this news.  I think you have been giving me warning that it would happen but I was hoping that it would be down the road.  I have worked for you for twenty years and when I say work for you I know that there is so much more to it than just working for you. I care for you.  I have always looked up to you and Mrs. Holly.

    "As I am writing this I am crying because I am so saddened. I do not know what quite to say.  I know that I told you the story that my oldest daughter has a rare disease and I felt that SETMA played a major part in getting her well.  This has made me feel dedicated to SETMA all these years.

    "I do not know what else to say.  I feel like I am not saying enough."

  4. Baptist Hospital Administrator - "You will be greatly missed as a physician.  The service you have provided to our community and the dedication to healthcare has benefitted so many people.  I'm very grateful to have worked with you. Congratulations on this next step.  Hope your grandson is doing well. Regards, Bryan"

  5. Phuc Lee, A SETMA Partner - "Sometimes my emotions won't allow me to express what and how I truly feel but i just wanted you to know that I am truly grateful and appreciate everything you have done in the past 6 years as I have gotten the opportunity to know and work with you. The sacrifice you made for SETMA is heartfelt and beyond what is expected. You are an honorable man and an awesome physician and you shall be sorely missed upon your retirement.  Thank you for everything sir."

  6. Faiza Anwar, a SETMA Partner's Wife - "My dear Dr Holly, I read your beautifully written email. You are an icon and institution for healthcare. The vacuum that you will leave will be impossible to fill but I know that you will be exceptional at anything that your heart desires. I wish you nothing but the best for this new journey of your life. 
    "You will be dearly missed. You and Mrs Holly are more than friends to me. You are like my family. Love you both!  Yours lovingly, FA"

  7. Jim Shepherd - "Larry, I am devastated and saddened in equal measure by this news...

    If it is any comforts it reminds me of the fate of some of my personal heroes.These include Sir Winston Churchill, General Charles De Gaulle, Dame Margaret Thatcher and General Douglas Mac Arthur.  

    "All were agents of change and though shunted aside for expedience, they left behind enduring generational changes.

    "In my own retirement I knew I would miss my patients but never suspected how much.  However this past summer i have been able to interact spontaneously with my grandchildren in ways that were impossible when I worked.  We have gone to the beach, flown cost to coast and have picked out a new bicycle and an I-phone.

    "Hopefully you can also enjoy some of this precious time.  Perhaps you and I could cooperate on some other venture, especially if it is of a voluntary nature.  Jim"

  8. Steve Best - "Wish you the best Doc, Lord bless."

  9. Mary Jane Castro, a Partner at SETMA - "Dear Dr Holly, I appreciate your understanding....  I still respect and appreciate everything you have done for SETMA and your people.  Your kindness, understanding and all the support you have given me and my family, will never be forgotten.  You have a legacy that will stand the test of time.  We will cherish and protect it. Sincerely, MJ."

  10. SETMA Department Head --  "I've always really liked you Dr. Holly and through the years I've grown to love you and your family.  I've always felt privileged to be part of SETMA.  I'm very grateful that you have allowed physical therapy to be a part of this great organization. 

    "You have supported my family and myself far beyond what any boss is ever expected to do and you have done it with grace, love and compassion.  You have seen me at my best and my worst and you have always instilled a confidence in me that has truly helped me.  You have shown consistent faith in me even though I have always felt that I've come up short in meeting our goals.  You have helped me far more than you could ever know.

    "Again, I'm very honored to have worked with you in providing health care to the patients of SETMA and forever grateful.  I sincerely hope the very best for you and all of your family.  I hope sometime we may have a chance to visit some and whatever the future holds for us I will always truly value you as my friend.

    God Bless you Sir"

  11. Mrs Henrich. Attorney, Wife of UT Health President - "Larry, you are such a wonderful doctor. We love you and Carolyn and look forward to your whatever your ACT II will bring.  I hope that it includes much more writing.  I always open your emails first.  Love, Mary"

  12. Jon Summerhouse --  "Congratulations Larry, You are one of the best men I have ever met, I look forward to seeing you before your retire.  May our Lord Jesus Christ Bless and keep you in His mighty right hand! Jon"

  13. Alumni Director, UT Health San Antonio - "Dr. Holly, As always, you have written a beautiful message that captures your feelings so wonderfully.  I know that this is a new beginning for you.  I'm anxious to see what God has planned for you next!  Thank you for sharing this.  God bless you and yours, sir. Steven"

  14. SETMA Laboratory Supervisor - "This news saddens me greatly, what you have built here has greatly impacted so many people! Most of my family members'  primary care physicians are SETMA providers and I'm always recommend people to come here as patients . I've also encourage a lot of people to apply to work here when positions are open.

    "My 6 y/o daughter has sickle cell anemia and has had countless hospital stays, starting next week she will start her biweekly blood transfusion leading up to her bone marrow transplant in January.  SETMA's ability to give me vacation time  every year , the patient care dpt that helped me knock out a few of her hospital bills and the wonderful insurance offered by you guys has made it possible to care for her and still be able to successfully manage the lab.

    "Hopefully the positives qualities you've instilled in this company continue after you are gone .People get accustomed to ways that have been set for a while but change although difficult can be good.  Enjoy your retirement!!!  Tiffany"

  15. A Minister Friend from California - "There is no surprise in this to me, as it expresses what I believe your previous email suggested.  Clarification and clarity are what it is.

    "Now, here is the BIG thing:  God is allowing this for His purposes!  I so believe this must have been necessary to pave the way for what lies ahead.  This storm surely has brought anguish.  But this is a brief "night" that is prelude to a wonderful New Day.   clergyman

    "If the creator of this document has dementia, I hereby volunteer for it also.  Clergyman

    (Editor's Note:  This response came from the fact that one SETMA partner was spreading the rumor that I have dementia.)

  16. University President's Response to Chinese Note - "Wow!  Your obvious impact that people see is in Southeast Texas, but I know what your generosity has done for us at Northwestern.  To see the email below, and I know hundreds/thousands more (some written, some not), just shows how your reach is not regional or national, it is worldwide!  Sincerely,  Chris Maggio"

  17. From Department Chair at Lamar - "Dr. Holly, This is beautiful and inspiring. I wish I would have had the opportunity to be one of your colleagues or patients! However, I'm thankful for other circumstances bringing us together.  Thank you for sharing and I will be sure to pass it along to my dad. I hope you and your family have a wonderful Labor Day Weekend.

    Brian Shook, DMA
    Department Chair
    Associate Professor of Music (Trumpet)

    I enjoyed your note. Here is an article I wrote about being a physician. Sounds like your father  http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Your-Life-Your-Health/pdfs/the-honor-of-being-a-physician.pdf
  1. Chinese Leader Expresses Sadness and Gratitude

    From: 刘晶炜

    "Dr Holly. I remember the following words from: you:  "From a personal standard point, in the 36 years I have maintained a private clinic before and including SETMA, 39% of the time I have used EMR as a means of documenting a patient encounter and as a means of improving the quality of care delivered in those clinics. If I practice for eight more years (a total of 44 clinic years), I will have practiced 22 years or 50% of my career with an EMR. To the next generation of healthcare providers, this observation will seen quaint but to those of us who form the bridge between "the before EMR' and "after EMR', it is significant."

    "It's so sad to get your retirement announcement.  I still remember the first pilgrimage visit to SETMA in 2014, and the "PCMH Bible" you provided us which guide me and my team in the following years on the journey of PCMH & EPM exploration.   You are the beacon light of future primary care, right now my eye is fulled with tear, no word to express my gratitude, respect and admiration for you. 

    "I still owe you a trip to China,  we are still exploring new primary care transformation journey in China following your direction. Whatever you decide to do going forward, we genuinely expect you to give us the opportunity to host you in China and continue help us to re-build EMR infrastructure for next generation primary care.  Jingwei"
Index
  1. From a SETMA NP - "ok.  now that I have composed myself and gotten over the shock....

    SETMA will not be the same without you and Mrs Holly. Thank you for everything you have done for YOUR Company. Many years of blood, sweat and tears has gone into this place and for that...

    "I am grateful. I will never forget your generosity and support when Stone was born and in the NICU even when you tried to kidnap him 🙂 you and Mrs Holly came to my room and prayed with me and that powerful pray brought me to tears and I knew then things were going to be ok with my little boy.

    I hope you enjoy retirement because you have earned ever moment of it.   Maybe you could even sleep past 4 am some days! Thank you Dr Holly!! Kelly

  2. A Beaumont Banker - "Wow.  I will look forward to visiting with you about this.  You are a great leader.

  3. NSU Executive - "Dr. Holly: Congratulations on an extraordinary career. You have been a positive influence on thousands of lives, and your impact on your community, state and nation has been enormous. We at Northwestern are proud and honored that you are an alumnus and that you have represented our university through the years with such dignity and distinction. Please let me know if we may ever assist you in any way, and please stay in touch. J. Pierce"

  4. SETMA Employee CPA - "Dr. Holly, I was going to write to you for another reason... literally opened my e-mail to do so... and saw this e-mail.  It brings tears to my eyes to think of what a great organization you have led and how exciting the times ahead for you must be.  I'm so happy for you that you will enjoy the next many years with your wife and family as well as serving Christ in whatever capacity He may lead you.  I mean that with all my heart.

    "So my other reason for writing is that I just gave Richmond notice of my resignation.   I'll have been here at SETMA for 15 years in January, so this was a difficult decision to make, and my heart is sad for all the people I'm leaving.  I too plan to finish out the year at SETMA to adequately train my replacement, but I didn't want to leave without expressing to you my sincerest and deepest gratitude for the opportunity to work as a CPA here.  I never expected to be able to work and raise my children at the same time, but SETMA gave me the most flexible job opportunity I could imagine that let me put family first.   It allowed my family to initially make it through tough financial times and then for the last ten to just enjoy what I do in an environment that I feel is as good as any I ever could have found.

    "I didn't want to leave without acknowledging to you that what you did for me in giving me this position and letting me work it as I do is one of God's greatest graces to me in literally my whole life.  I am very grateful and will always hold you and SETMA in high regard and honor. 
    May God bless you and Mrs. Holly with the greatest of adventures in this next phase of your life,  Sincerely, Laura"


  5. Richard Smith - "My first thought is will I ever see my Dear Friend again ?
    I sure hope so "Doc" ! I'm going to be totally lost for a while !  I love you my Dear Friend ! Thank you for taking care of me and along with GOD!"

  6. SETMA NP  -- "Your retirement announcement shocked me as it did so many. It saddens me to see you leave but I rejoice in knowing God has great plans and purpose in your life. I look forward to hearing about some of your surprise blessings that you bestow upon complete strangers.   It wouldn't surprise me at all to see you and Mrs Holly one week in the snow marveling at the Northern lights and the next week in the dessert praying over our troops.   You have been so much more than a founder of SETMA, you have been our true North.  Your leaving does make me a bit nervous about the future. As you know 15 years ago I took my mom's advice when she told me to go work for Dr Holly "he is a good, honest man". Thank you for giving me that opportunity. I wish many blessings to you and Mrs Holly during this next adventure in life. Dana"

  7. Johnathan Flowers - "Congrats, Doc! Well deserved"
  1. Leigh Parker - "I remember Atticus -- Doc,     I just heard of the news of your pending retirement. While the timing is inconceivable to me, I am confident that your decision is another act of sacrificial love for SETMA.   The bonus is that you get to redeem those five or so years you had planned to stay at SETMA and exchange them for an early start to the decades of adventure you get to share with your wonderful bride and those grandchildren.

    "I've known you for 40 years. Regardless of the situation or the person, you never chose the easy path of least resistance. You were called to do the unpleasant things. Your callings in ministry and in medicine compelled you to navigate terrain that most refrain from traveling:

    "I remember your conviction to bring a bus load of poor people and minorities into your house of worship in the 1970s and early 1980s.

    "After 9/11. in the midst of fear, I remember your public stand in the newspaper to defend your colleagues and friends of the Islamic faith.

    "You raised issues and provided accountability in the Southern Baptist Convention in areas that would have happily remained untouchable by everyone else.

    "You challenged (and likely infuriated) some of your colleagues across the nation about the necessity of electronic medical records and why it was no longer a prudent medical practice to rely upon paper documentation.

    "I remember your deep friendships with people suffering from AIDs and those about to spend many years in prison.
    "And, I know of only a fraction of the times where you, in secret, freely gave away your time, your treasure, and medical expertise to those who would never be able to return the blessing.  

    "I gave you the following literary reference on your 50th Wedding Anniversary to Mrs. Holly, but it seems more appropriate now than ever.  In To Kill a Mockingbird, the Finch children are brought into the home of their elderly neighbor, Miss Maudie. Atticus Finch has inevitably lost the trial of Tom Robinson, and faces some isolation and certain backlash from his town. "As we ate, we sensed that this was Miss Maudie's way of saying that as far as she was concerned, nothing had changed. She sat quietly in a kitchen chair, watching us.

    "Suddenly she spoke: "Don't fret, Jem. Things are never as bad as they seem.'
    Indoors, when Miss Maudie wanted to say something lengthy she spread her fingers on her knees and settled her bridgework. This she did, and we waited. 

    "I simply want to tell you that there are some men in this world who were born to do our unpleasant jobs for us.   Your father's one of them." 

    "We're the safest folks in the world," said Miss Maudie. "We're so rarely called on to be Christians, but when we are, we've got men like Atticus to go for us.' 

    "I often wondered why a self professed shoe-less poor boy, who walked dirt roads in Louisiana, would not simply take the easier paved road of success and embrace the crowds and the love of the masses by going along to get along.
    "It is simple, really. You love people enough to help them by espousing truth, despite the loneliness or the pain it inflicts upon you.

    "Doc, you are Atticus Finch--- You simply exchanged a brief case for a medical bag.  Go enjoy your next calling.  We love you. Leigh"

Index
  1. Scott Anthony, SETMA NP --  "I watched"

    "Dr. Holly, it is with sadness and a heavy heart that I write to you now. In my past 19 1/2 years at SETMA, I never thought I would see this day. My emotions vacillate between anger, shock, sadness, fear and happiness for you. My wife and I have never worked as an NP for anyone but you. We have learned so much from you and respect you deeply. I hope the lessons you taught us will be evident in our actions on a daily basis.

    I watched as you went to other pods on Calder after you were finished to help other providers see pts
    I watched as you came in early after waking up at 3 am and making hospital rounds to read x-rays 
    I watched as you told other providers " they are not my pts, they are not your pts, they are OUR pts
    I watched when you treated NPs as colleagues and spoke against the term "mid-level"
    I watched when you didn't ask anyone to do something you were not willing to do
    I watched when you put GOD first in all of SETMAs dealings
    I watched when you pushed all SETMA providers to be better and pursue excellence
    I watched when you were a man of your word
    I watched when you loved your wife so much that you refused to make rounds with a female provider
    I watched when you created templates to help us take better care of our pts
    I watched when you based your success on how successful you made other people
    I watched when you were SETMAs ambassador and told others our story and we were all proud
    I watched when you worked tirelessly on whatever project we needed done to improve our care of our pts
    I watched when you treated all pts and employees with dignity and respect

    "This is just a small list of what I have seen while working with you. I know I am leaving hundreds of examples out. I can only hope that along the way I become half the husband, provider, grandfather, father and Christian that you are. You will be missed more than you know. I wish nothing but health and happiness for you and Mrs. Holly in your retirement. I hope now you can "watch" us and see us doing things that make you proud. God bless you Dr. Holly and please keep in touch."

    Second Note from Scott:  "My heart hurts.  I wish I had better words to tell you what you have and still do mean to me.  I have looked up to you for 19 1/2 years and don't know how things will go.  if you get a new cell you better give me the number(half-hearted smile)  I love you and Mrs holly  I hope y'all have great times and make wonderful memories"

Index

  1. Maureen  -- "Larry, zo sorry to hear about your retirement, but I do hope that you continue to share your innovative and patient-centered ideas with us all! You are an amazing leader and a wonderful friend!  Warmly, Maureen

    Wow, what an honor to read these amazing tribute to your life,  your career, your integrity, inspiration, expertise and humanity!  Enjoy every minute of learning in China and stay close!  Hugs,  Maureen

  2. Alicia, SETMA NP - "Thank you Dr Holly for the email.  This transition is unsettling.  I valued working for you because of your integrity, honesty, and respect.  I struggle to envision a SETMA after you are gone.   I thank you for all of your leadership; but I remain especially  grateful for your friendship and assistance during difficult days.  I will never forget your understanding and kindness.  I also respect your gracious wife; she is an example to me daily.  I will continue to pray for you during the coming months. Very sincerely, Alicia"

  3. Nicole, SETMA NP - "Dr. Holly, Though I have not had the opportunity to work beside you for long, the time that I have had has been at the least fulfilling. You are kind, supportive, and driven in all of your endeavors. I just want to thank you again for providing me an opportunity to start my career as a nurse practitioner with SETMA. For many years, I have dreamed of being a part of the SETMA team as a provider. With that said, I will definitely miss you and your Monday morning "hello"  Thank you for believing in your team of practitioners and valuing what we bring to the table for healthcare. I know I will work hard to continue proving our value as a provider in assisting patient's best outcomes with the support of SETMA doctors in this transition. God is good and He provides in time of need. When we stumble, He prevents our fall. I reach up to Him daily for strength, wisdom, and endurance. Praying for you is in this transition, as I know you have struggled with this decision since July.  Have fun and ENJOY retirement. Sincerely, Nicole"
  1. Ted Carpenter, Universal American
    September 19, 2011

    Deborah H. Morrill, Vice President and Chief Development Officer, UT Health Science Center San Antonio

    Dear Ms. Morrill,

    On behalf of Universal American, we are delighted to make a contribution to the University of Texas health Science Center San Antonio to the endowment of he James L. Holly Distinguished Professorship in Patient-Centered Medical home. We are making a total contribution of $100,000 I honor of Dr. Holly. Enclosed is an initial check for $50,000, and we are pledging the remaining amount by July 21, 2012.

    Our organization works with thousands of physicians across the United States.  Further, we collaborate with dozens of physician leaders who dedicate themselves to organizing outstanding patient care by seeking new and innovative ways to improve the entire patient care process.  We are very fortunate to work with some of the very best physician leaders in the country.

    That said, Dr. Holly is in a league by himself.  His energy, passion, and unrelenting commitment to improving quality of care is without equal in my experience.  He drives positive change within his practice and community, implements value-added technology to improve clinical outcomes, reads and write prolifically regarding clinical and public health issues and generously shares what he has learned with all interested parties across the United States. Under Dr. Holly's leadership, SETMA has been honored countless times for their innovation, technology and services to the community.  By far, however, their greatest accomplishments is the care and quality that each SETMA patient receives. The are the real beneficiaries of this extraordinary physician practice.  (emphasis added)

    For all these reasons, it is a real pleasure to support the endowment for the new Dr. and Mrs. James L. Holly Distinguished Chair at the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio.

    Sincerely, Theodore M. Carpenter Jr., President Universal American, MA Division

Index
  1. Larry and Carolyn Sadness -- Memories and Musings

    As I prepare my final newspaper column which will be published on September 13, 2018 -- 21 years since the first -- which is entitled "My Valedictory Address and Retirement Notice," I look around my desk and office and see " a life and a career" in a snapshot.

    I see my framed diploma from the University of Texas Medical School in San Antonio dated May 26, 1973, along with my Texas license to practice medicine dated August 1, 1973 and my Louisiana medical license dated December 6. 1973. 

    I remember the day I took the Texas examination and the day I took the Louisiana examination. I remember the physician from Cuba who had emigrated to the USA and who were taking the Louisiana exam. They expressed amazement at how quickly I finished each part of the exam. I told them, "It just does take me long to look at a horseshoe."

    Prominently on my desk and in my office are pictures of my wife and me, and of my children and grandchildren. There is a picture of Ron Fittz, my closest friend who died over thirty years ago but whom I remember every day.

    There are books and other pictures and objects which reflect awards and honors and personal relationships but which mostly reflect a life. 

    I am not melancholy as I look around but I am sobered. I realize that in a few months, this chapter -- more like an encyclopedia than a chapter -- will be done. 

    Yet, I am already looking forward to January 1, 2019, which will begin this news part of my life and of Carolyn's. I am looking forward to studying French at Lamar University and maybe Creative writing. I wonder what that costs?  I wonder if I will do well?  I look forward to having extended time to read through the Bible and to exercise regularly. 

    Of course, I will write. Maybe, I'll write a novel -- I think everyone imagines doing that. In that SETMA, as we know it today, will cease to exist, I may write the history of this organization. I certainly will continue to opine upon the political maelstrom in which we find ourselves.

    I will play cards and chess with my grandchildren and Carolyn and I will travel. For most people that means exotic, faraway places but for us that will mean visiting places which have meant a great deal to us. 

    And as I walk around my office, I look at certificates and mementoes, I realize that I am doing that in our home more and more. Daily, I create mental images of the tapestry of Carolyn and my life together. Who could have asked for more -- not me. I am grateful for hundreds and thousands of people who have contributed generously to our lives. And, of course, there is the "Hall of Fame," of those who are at the heart of these memories. 

    Maybe, I will write about them.

    Have you ever told yourself that everything is O.K., only to have reality tell you that it's not? 

    This morning as I have begun telling my patients of my retirement, the heavy sadness that has come over me, let's me know what a poor liar I am when I keep telling myself "it's, O.K."

  1. Fifty Years of Memories By James L. Holly, MD Your Life Your Health The Examiner September 6, 2018

    In September 2018, UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine marks its fiftieth year training physicians in Texas.  As the school looks back on fifty years, my wife, Carolyn Bellue Holly and I look back on our journey which brought us to San Antonio in 1969 as first year medical students.  I use the plural because as much as it is possible for two people to occupy one place in a professional school, we did.  After graduating from college in May, 1965, Carolyn and I married, August 7, 1965.  That first year we taught school in Golden Meadow, Louisiana and then moved to Waco, Texas to enter graduate school at Baylor University.

    In August of 1966, after moving to Waco, Carolyn and I had a portrait made.  When she commented that we did not have a lot of money, I told her that someday, we would be very glad to have that portrait.  Fifty-two years later, we are. This is the portrait.  Alas, all was not so great.  For our first anniversary, I gave Carolyn a tall, pole ivy with a note that as this plant grew and flourished it would reflect our love and marriage.  One week later, it was grave-yard dead from a cut worm.

    IMG_0308

    During that first year at Baylor (Fall, 1966 - Spring 1967), it became increasingly obvious that while I had started college in Pre-Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M, human medicine would be my life's work.  In the fall of 1967, I worked full time and began doing part-time pre-med courses at Baylor.  In the spring of 1968, I took the Medical College Admissions Text (MCAT) and applied for admission to medical school.  One of the ironies of our journey was that the American Association of Medical College (AAMC) sponsored the MCAT.  It was impossible to know at this time that in 1970-1971 and 1971-1972 I would serve as a voting member of the Executive Committee of the AAMC and would vote twice on the accreditation of the Long School of Medicine, and would be the first medical student to serve as a voting member of a medical school accreditation site visit (Cornell Medical College in New York).

    In the fall of 1968, in class one day, I learned of my future, when a fellow student said to me, "I hear you are going to be a doctor."  I looked at him in amazement because he knew something which I did not.  The Pre-Med Advisor, a remarkable man, Dr. Virgil Tweedy, had received a copy of my acceptance letter which I had not yet received.  Immediately, I knew where the letter was.  It was at our previous address.  Immediately, I left school and drove to 2623 Bosque where we had lived.  For several minutes, I stood at the mail box. I knew my letter was in that box, but I also knew that it was illegal for me to open that mail box and no one was home. 

    For the first and for the last time to my knowledge, I intentionally broke a Federal Law.  I opened the box.   In it was my future.  It was December 8, 1968 when I opened that mailbox, but my acceptance letter was dated November 22, 1968, which curiously was a Sunday.  I still have that letter as Carolyn had it framed for me.  As we look back on those days and remember the events that marked our journey, we both remember that as my acceptance letter was received with one semester and a summer left before I was to start medical school in September, 1968, I still had to complete three semester hours of biology, eight hours of organic chemistry and eight hours of physics.  Working full time and completing nineteen hours of science by August, 1969 now seems daunting, but we did it.

    The letter also instructed me to send in a $30.00 deposit to secure my place in the 1969 class.  I did.

    As we look back on those halcyon days fifty years ago, we realize that we have lived the entire history of UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine.  We have participated in the momentous events which have created one of the premier medical schools in America.

    In August, 1969, we loaded up a U-Haul trailer and moved our little family which included Nina, our Shetland Sheep dog, to an apartment complex across the street from Fort Sam Houston Beach Pavilion Medical Center in San Antonio.  Carolyn was to teach and we were to manage the apartment complex.  It meant a long drive each day to school, but it was worth it for free rent and a one hundred dollar monthly stipend.  Our first day there, the owner came to our door and told Carolyn to get a bucket and mop.  I asked what that was for.  The owner said that Carolyn was going to clean an apartment and that I needed to climb up to the roof of the third story of the complex and reset a switch for the air conditioner system.

    When I objected, she said, "You didn't think you were getting free rent and a salary just for showing apartments did you?"  I reminded her that that was our agreement and she indicated that it was being changed.  I thanked her and told her we would be out in one hour.  I rented another trailer, went to the Work Force office and hired two men and we moved.

    These fifty-year-old memories are crystal clear in our mind.  What at the moment seemed like a crisis, over the next four years it was a blessing as it would have been impossible with only one car to work out the details of transportation to and from Carolyn's teaching job and my classes.

    Again, ironically, on January 22, 1973, I was in a clinical rotation at Fort Sam Houston Beach Pavilion when the word spread over the facility that former President Lyndon Johnson had been brought into the emergency room.  He had died at home.  I was not in the building where he was brought but it was just one more remarkable event which marked our time at UT Health.

    On the first day of medical school, we had an assembly in the main auditorium.  Forty-three-years later, due to the benevolence of a friend, that auditorium would be named after Dr. and Mrs. James L. Holly.  This portrait hangs in that auditorium today.

    IMG_0291

    In 1975, I began moon lighting in the emergency room at Christus St. Elizabeth in Beaumont, Texas, and in 1976 moved my young family, including our two children, two dogs, a cat and a bird to our home for the next 45 years.

    The years have been filled with wonderful, sometimes sad, and sometimes glorious, memories.  It has never crossed our minds to live anywhere else.  We have never had any regrets about our choice of where to raise our family. We have given our best to this community and we have received back the best the community has to offer.

    As we attend the 50th Anniversary Gala in San Antonio later this month, we will retrace our trip which we made in 1976 when we moved to Beaumont.  We will sit with some of my professors who taught me medicine and we will visit with classmates who made a different journey to the same destination forty-nine years ago.  We will celebrate the remarkable advances which UT Health San Antonio has made from a two-building campus to a packed landscape of world-class facilities for teaching students, training doctors, researching new treatments and treating patients.

    Carolyn, our family and I look back on these last fifty years with awe and wonder for the honor of having the privilege of being a physician and for having the joy of serving this community.  And, when we soon offer our valedictory to the Golden Triangle, it will be with unfettered and unconditional thanksgiving and gratitude.

Index
  1. My Valedictory Address and the Announcement of my Retirement By James L. Holly, MD Your Life Your Health The Examiner September 13, 2018

    For twenty-one years -- September 11, 1997 to September 13, 2018 --  in columns entitled "Thoughts About Things" and "Your Life Your Health," the owner, editor and publisher of The Examiner have allowed me to write a weekly column in their paper.  I am grateful for that and  in the last of these articles, wish to express my appreciation and gratitude to them for this privilege.

    It is inevitable that all things come to an end and as I announce my retirement from Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP, I present my final column for The Examiner.  In these twenty-one years, this column has discussed exciting innovations in healthcare, announced transformative initiatives in the delivery of that care, discussed public health issues and policies and examined many health issues.  All columns are catalogued at www.jameslhollymd.com (soon to be changed to JLHollyMD.icloud.com.

    As time goes by, the information in these columns will become dated, but they will always reflect the foundation and the history of Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP (SETMA), which can name among other honors being named as "one of thirty exemplar practices in the United States by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation".

    Thank each one of you who has read this column and who have encouraged SETMA through these years.

    Retirement Announcement

    It is with sadness and regret that I announce my retirement from Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP and from the practice of medicine in Southeast Texas, effective December 31, 2018.

    November 4, 2018, I turn 75 years-of-age.  When asked I have always assured others that I intend to work until I was eighty.  That was my intent, but circumstances prevent that from happening.  Over the past three years, SETMA has experienced economic pressures caused by Health and Human Services' (HHS) CMS's reduction over the past seven years of the reimbursement for Medicare Advantage by twenty-eight percent, aggravated by the Affordable Care Act tax on the funds paid to the HMO, which tax cost the IPA in which SETMA participates, $1,700,000 annually.  

    With my years in solo practice in Beaumont, I have practiced in this community for 43 years.  These have been wonderful years for me and for my family.

    A principle of organizational life is that when change is made, the most constructive thing old leadership can do is to step aside and wish the new leaders the best.  This I do.  SETMA is well prepared to proceed into the future, true to its values and aware of the challenges which need to be faced.

    I am proud of SETMA.   I am proud of the decisions we made and how we have conducted our practice.  SETMA has done things which no one has ever done and the things we have done which others are now doing, we did before almost anyone.  We have also cared for the most vulnerable and needy people in our community.  I am proud of that.  The partners of SETMA even funded a Foundation which helps provide care for patients.

    As I write these words my mind races across the past forty-three years.   Mental images appear of thousands of individuals whom I have cared for, worked with, or known.  I wish I could begin naming them, some living, some long since gone, but all cherished in memory.  HIPPA and the inevitability of omitting important people makes it impossible to name names.

    These years have been rich and rewarding.  There are many things which I know I could or should have done better, but where I failed it was never for want of trying.  I am comforted and challenged by the words of President Theodore Roosevelt who said:

    "It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.  The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually try to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat."  Theodore Roosevelt, "Citizens in a Republic," the Sorbonne, Paris, France, April 23, 1910, quoted in The Man in the Arena, ed. John Allen Gable (Oyster Books,

    N.Y, Theodore Roosevelt Association, 1987), p. 54)

    There is not a community in which I would rather have spent my career than in Beaumont, Texas and the Golden Triangle.  As a young man and wife with two young children, two dogs and a cat, my family arrived in Beaumont in 1975.  And, now forty-three years later, at the end of a long career, we do not think of "moving" to a retirement center but we look forward to spend all of our coming years doing what we have always done in a different venue but in Beaumont.  We look forward to the adventure of realizing who we are in a new arena.  And when our time is done, our resting place will be in Beaumont, Texas.

    Due to the circumstances of my retirement, I will not have the option of practicing medicine in Southeast Texas, at least not for the next five years, but I can continue to perform my most important roles which are to practice my faith in Jesus Christ, to perform my vows to my wife of fifty-three years, Carolyn Ann Bellue Holly, to love my children and grandchildren and to reintroduce myself to the health and wellness center.  I do not fear for my well-being there, but I am anxious for the Center's staff's emotional stability when I appear.

    As I try to put this announcement in context, I recall that in 2008, Carolyn and I were in England when we lost an extremely valuable object.  The manager of the Connaught asked, "Dr. Holly, you don't seem to be very upset about this?"  I responded, "Oh, I am disappointed but that object can be replaced, or it can be lived without; if I had lost my wife that would be something to be devastated over."  

    And, so it is now, as I make this transition, it is disappointing to me and I suspect it will be to others that I am retiring, yet to be "fair and balanced," there may be some who sigh and think, "I'm glad that's over."  But, the reality is that what is fundamentally and ultimately important in my life is not changing.  As a result, while my heart is heavy, my face is smiling and my mind rushes about imagining the future.

    The reality is also that the name SETMA will continue, the management will not change significantly, the care available will continue to improve and it will still be a very good place to work and to perform the act of "health caring" for others.  Change is always stressful, but if we take a deep breath and believe in who we are, "this too shall pass."  

    The closest biblical reference to such an affirmation is II Corinthians 4:17-18 which states:  "For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory;  While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal."

    It is my hope and expectation that all of the staff and professionals in SETMA will remain and will be committed to the same values and standards which have been our credo for the past twenty-three years, all will find a new iteration of who and what they are in this great community and practice.

    And so, I bid you adieu which in its origin meant "to God."  It is not good-bye as each of you will always be a part of our lives and hopefully we of yours.  We will be as close as our prayers, our memories and our hopes and dreams.  God bless each one of you.

Index
  1. From Debbie  Morrell

    Dear Dr. Holly,

    I am like Mary Henrich, and always look at your emails first. They, and you, have inspired me over the years, and invariably given me an unexpected lift when I really needed one and a reminder to always strive to be my best self  - and honestly, I save them and go back to them often.  Your devotion to your lovely Carolyn, your consummate kindness; your genuine caring for others; your wonderful and warm smile from a face that shines with joy; and your exemplary generosity, in every way, are but a few of the many things I admire about you.

    I hope this transition will allow more time for you and Carolyn to be with us here in San Antonio. 

    You are a bright light for medicine and the world, and we are truly blessed to have your enduring legacy as a significant part of the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio!  

     The comments and good wishes from people who love and admire you from across the world are testament to your impact --- and are almost as remarkable as you are. You have paid much good forward, and so many of us owe you so much. 

    Love to you and Carolyn,

    Debbie  Morrell

Index
  1. Dale Fontenot

    Final Column for Your Life Your Health September 13, 2018

    The announcement of your retirement, although a surprise, has not hit me like the words "Final Column" has hit me today. For more than 15 plus years I have had the privilege of working with you on a weekly basis, both as a contractor and an employee...In that time I have cared for a chronically ill wife and I have buried that wife, I have suffered loneliness and I have found a new love that I have taken for my wife. All these changes occurred while I continued to serve you and SETMA.

    The money I have earned over all those years has gone to supporting my family in many different ways and has been very much appreciated.  When I was at that lowest point in my life, SETMA (you) gave me hope that things would get better and I have never forgotten that.

    I will miss working with you weekly as much as I will miss my lovely wife asking me every Thursday "Did you get the article finished?" but I will also be available should you need help with any future endeavors.  So, with this reply to you, at least as far as the weekly articles go, Done for the final time. Dale
  1. Ross Shauberger

    A physician's response upon my retirement.  I met this physician when he was a five-year-old patient.  He told me at 5 that he wanted to be a physician. I shook his hand and told him he could be.  He almost joined SETMA

    Howdy!

    I was chatting with Laura today, and she told me you were retiring. I would first like to say congratulations. Your lifetime of striving to build a practice that not only serves the community that you adore, but also has inspired and ministered to more folks than you will likely ever know. In truth, you don't need some young, snot nosed Internist to tell you these things. You know your worth and are likely at peace with the extraordinary life you have lived. 

    I do think it is important however to express my gratitude to you. You see, you have served as a stalwart mentor to me, even if you were never aware of this fact. You gave me a gift a few years ago. The gift of opportunity. I will always be grateful for that gift. Although I was lead in a different direction, I truly believed that our paths crossed for a very important purpose. 

    You showed me the boundless opportunity for hope within the practice of medicine. I took those lessons to Virginia, where I have helped build a successful Hospitalist practice. The success we have enjoyed has been predicated on the principal that People are the key to building a successful team. 

    Well, I won't take of anymore of your time. I wanted you to know that you made a difference in this Doctor's life. 
    God Bless You Dr. Holly. 

    Regards,
    Ross

    Ross Shauberger, DO
    Board Certified Internal Medicine, ABPS
    Internist/Hospitalist
    Internal Medicine Faculty
    Johnston Memorial Hospital, Abingdon, VA

Index
  1. History of UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine
    Larry

    Thank you for including me in this email communication. 

    I had no where near the personal contact with these remarkable educators as you but I can share with you several notable encounters.
    As I have previously related to you my first day on the Med school campus started with a private meeting with Dean Panhill where he welcomed me to the class entering the fall of "69 and in my presence signed my letter of acceptance. He offered to help assist my needs in any way he could and I felt enormously reassured.

    Dignified to the point of elegance and with enormous aplomb is how his image remains in my memory and he had the cleanest, neatest white jacket I have ever seen. It seemed to glow but then that was probably his aura.

    My first encounter with Dean Taylor was over the phone. I was visiting my wife's family in Weimar, Texas where my beloved father in law and I were planning to go dove hunting.

    The phone rang and Dean Taylor asked my mother in law if I was there and could he please speak with me. It was the most important call I have ever received as he informed me that despite the fact that the academic year had begun several weeks earlier there was currently an opportunity for me to join the class if I was interested understanding there would be special challenges to overcome. 

    I immediately packed up, headed for San Antonio and lived with Jack Harvey and Jay Hoecker in the hospital until my family got moved into some apartments on Fredericksburg road. I saw Dean Taylor off and on thereafter and his soothing bass voice was always reassuring. He was a good man.

    These two men were superheros

    To me.

    Dr Cander was a tough dude. He wanted nothing less than excellence from all of us and I'm still not so sure that his eastern roots didn't in some way influence his view of us Texans. I had to take an oral exam hosted by Dr Cander regarding the recognition and management of CHF. He wasn't terribly pleased with my explanation. I felt bad days later but I never forgotten the lessons learned that day and the section of cardiology was clearly staffed by some brilliant physicians.

    Regarding your eminent retirement I wish to extend to you my congratulation on a long and productive career in you chosen community and your specialty.

    I cannot imagine any graduate from our class having contributed more to well being of so many patients who have been fortunate enough to have you supervising their medical care.

    I have the very greatest respect for you as a person and as a physician.

    No one in our class more thoroughly epitomizes the successful application of the education we received 69-73.

    No one in our class will better represent the legacy of our experience in medical school at the upcoming celebration.

    To you I wish all the best.

    Dennis Toland

  2. Dante Rangel

    Prelude

    "By creating a legacy, by living a life worth remembering, you become immortal." Bousman and Whannell; 2005

     It is with a heavy heart that I acknowledge the sudden retirement of Dr. Holly. He is someone I admire greatly and it pains me to know that this decision was not of his own choosing. The quality of care he provides is not something that can be replaced, especially not by a larger corporation. It is by no means that I degrade or attack the character of the physician that replaces him but I know that it is impossible for someone to provide his degree of care. His EMR is something that should be celebrated and used nationwide. It is a poor choice of any company to terminate its use and an even worse decision for the patients and the providers that once relied on it. I want Dr. Holly to know that he has already gone beyond the typical. He isn't one to resign himself to the norm and his life's work reflects this. But the story isn't over quite yet, he has instilled in each of us what it truly means to be human and it is up to us to carry his influence out into the world.

    Shadowing Dr. Holly

    Being invited to shadow Dr. Holly was a welcome but unexpected occurrence. My father and Dr. Holly met some years ago in Santa Fe, an event that forever changed my path forward. I admit I trembled as I read the email invitation. The past few months have been tumultuous for me. I was rejected from medical school in late February and lost my grandfather shortly after in late March. It weighs on me heavily knowing that he never had the opportunity to see me succeed after his years of sacrifice, a fault that lands squarely with me. I had no idea what to expect really. Beaumont in a sense was far away from my scope of view and I never believed I would have the chance to work with Dr. Holly with his busy schedule. In the middle of July it was decided, I was to shadow him.

    Monday morning, 6:30 sharp, I arrived outside of Dr. Holly's office on Calder Ave. Before I even had time to collect my thoughts I locked eyes with a man who was waiting for me outside. It was Dr. Holly himself.

    The first day at the office was overwhelming to say the very least. From the very moment I met Dr. Holly I admit I was intimidated. Not because he was rude or offending, it was because of his eminence. Here was a man who has dedicated his life to the betterment and protection of others. Someone I would consider a genius and I had the opportunity to shadow him. "What would he think of me? How should I act?" These were some of the many questions that I tried to think about, but with Dr. Holly there was no moratorium. Instantly we entered a conversation of my background, my skills and academic performance. He had bigger plans for me. He wanted to talk to some medical school deans and garner information to aid in what appeared to be my never ending dirge of a journey. And suddenly it was 7:30. In a flash Dr. Holly informed me that we would be traveling to the nearby town of Lumberton. When we arrived he introduced me to his team for the day. Soon the first patient arrived and that is when the day truly began.

    I was in awe at his speed. Immediately Dr. Holly was on the move, careful to make sure each patient was seen quickly. This was directly contrary to what I was used to, physicians letting their team do all of the work. Once we were inside he introduced me to another one of his treasures. His EMR. It was incredibly comprehensive and was the culmination of a lifetime of work fueled by the need and desire to shrug off mediocrity. The entire system was geared towards maximizing efficiency and assisting the patient in documenting their special needs. What impressed me the most had to be the heart study that was included in the EMR. This study ran probability to predict the outcomes patients could expect if they changed specific things in their lives. This astounded me. In all of my days shadowing I had never seen an EMR of this caliber. Everything else paled in comparison and seemed clunky, inefficient, and most importantly, a massive waste of time. It was clear that Dr. Holly was unlike any physician I had ever shadowed before. Lunchtime came and I had the lovely opportunity to meet his wife Caroline.  This meeting was unfortunately brief as she informed me that she was needed in Louisiana to help take care of her mother and then soon, we were back to Lumberton.

    As we were returning Dr. Holly reminded me of the devastation hurricane Harvey had wrought. Devastation that was still very much real for many people here even though mentions of the damaging Hurricane were now nothing more than whispers. A great deal of patients we had seen in the morning had been affected and to be honest I was disgusted. I was aware of what the "outside world" thought of many of the people here. A twisted caricature that they had created to demonize the people that supported an ideology they might not personally agree with. People they would consider "white trash". I was disgusted because these were people first and foremost. Not ambassadors of an ideology. People that needed our help and Dr. Holly did an amazing job embodying the exemplar of what not only a physician should be, but what we should be as people. Looking beyond petty squabbles and reaching into what really matters, the support of our fellow man. He made them laugh, smile, and most importantly, trust him, a boon in a time where it seems like many physicians forget about the importance of empathy. Dr. Holly would finish with: "Now here is my personal number. I want you to call me on "this day' so you can tell me how you are doing." Unbelievable, is the only word I can use to describe this.

    It was less than 24 hours into my stay with Dr. Holly and I could feel that I was forever changed as a person. The days progressed at lightning speed with Dr. Holly at the helm, blazing along in a tireless surge. By this time I was already exhausted and mystified by his seemingly unyielding fervor. My experience with Dr. Holly ended with an incredible trip to Avery Island in Louisiana to visit the Tabasco factory. On this trip I was able to speak to him about so many different things and being 74 years young, I knew he had the experience and wisdom I was looking for. He counseled me on my dreams, my progress, and my skills. I admit that it hurts knowing that I have been trying to get into medical school for so long and sometimes I feel that I am not worth it or not capable. Dr. Holly made it very clear that I was not a fraud and was someone he saw not only doing well but excelling in this field. I can tell you that it has meant so much to me to hear these words from someone that I look up to. I am forever grateful to him for this opportunity and I will remember it eternally.

    Dr. Holly embodies everything that I want to be. From his endless wealth of historical knowledge, to the love of his fellow man, his disdain for mediocrity, ambivalence, and his tactful entrepreneurial skills. He is the kind of person that only comes about once every few generations. There are few words that can describe someone as mercurial as him and where words fail, only an epithet will do. As for now, I know that this experience has changed me for the better and I can only hope that I will have another chance to get to know Dr. Holly, the ineffable.

    -Dante N. Rangel, 11/09/18

  3. My Granddaughter Holly Victoria's Note About her Grand's stories 

    I am going to pick my package up today because I was super busy yesterday with school and homework 😭

    I miss y'all so so much. I love you and Grandy immensely. I am beyond thankful for the opportunities y'all have given us throughout our lives.

    Along with the opportunities, I am thankful for the guidance, morals, and advice y'all have awarded us along the way.

    Growing up and hearing Grandys stories always seemed to be repetitive, but I have since been using almost all of them in everyday life without even knowing about it.

    I was asked in a homework assignment last week to recount the best advice I was ever given and grandy's story about the possum and unintended consequences immediately came to mind.

    Without realizing it I had been applying that story to everything I was doing for the past few years. I just wanted to thank y'all for going above and beyond for all of us 💙

    Holly's Grandmother's response

    Holly, you can't imagine what this note means to me & Grandy.  That's, all We need from our life, our grandchildren knowing God and living successfully bc of faith in God.  

    You have made my day.  We have been through some tough days.  Grandy is retiring Dec. 31st & not bc he wanted to.  Very unpleasant time for us.

    Holly Victoria's response about Retirement. 

    I am so sorry to hear that. I got Grandy's email and was concerned about it. But just like y'all have taught us, God has a plan and reason for everything. It may not be what we all want or what we think we need. But He knows the plans he has for us.

    I can't imagine how Grandy must feel as I know he doesn't but like his job, but LOVES it. I love y'all so much 💙

  1. Retirement Response Mark Toups

    Larry,

    Our community both lay and professional benefit from your insights and drive past, present and future. Pray Stanley Kunitiz poem gives pause to consider "where to what next" Carl Sandburg. Stanley wrote his last poem The Round at age 100.

    From The Round:

    I can scarcely wait till tomorrow
    when a new life begins for me,
    as it does each day,
    as it does each day.

    Sandburg moved at age 65 beginning a new season in an extraordinary journey writing Honey and Salt

    Can love be locked away and kept hid?
    Yes and it gathers dust and mildew
    and shrivels itself in shadows
    unless it learns the sun can help,
    snow, rain, storms can help
    birds in their one-room family nests
    shaken by winds cruel and crazy
    they can all help:
    lock not away your love nor keep it hid.

    Carl Sandburg, from Honey and Salt 1963

    The Layers
    Stanley Kunitz<
    https://www.poets.org/node/44308>, 1905 - 2006

    I have walked through many lives,
    some of them my own,
    and I am not who I was,
    though some principle of being
    abides, from which I struggle
    not to stray.

    When I look behind,
    as I am compelled to look
    before I can gather strength
    to proceed on my journey,
    I see the milestones dwindling
    toward the horizon
    and the slow fires trailing
    from the abandoned camp-sites,
    over which scavenger angels
    wheel on heavy wings.

    Oh, I have made myself a tribe
    out of my true affections,
    and my tribe is scattered!
    How shall the heart be reconciled
    to its feast of losses?

    Respectfully,

    Mark Toups
Index
  1. Valedictory
    November 29, 2018
    Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP
    By James L. Holly, MD,
    CEO, SETMA, LLP

    A valedictory is a farewell address on an occasion of "leave taking," but, what do you say when you stand before people with whom you have shared life for twenty-four to seventy-five years?  It is impossible to name each one, although in the coming years, many of you will be written about.

    As I stand here before you on the occasion of my "leave taking" of SETMA, I remember seminal points in my life.  I don't remember the first time I met my mother and father " I was very young " but my first memories of them were the same as those I have years after their deaths.  They were wonderful and bigger than life to me.

    I remember how my life was defined by an experience when I was four-years-old in 1947.  My father borrowed a wooden boat and we went fishing on Little River in Central Louisiana.  There were four of us and only three seats, so as the youngest, I sat in the bottom of the boat.  I did as any four-year-old would do, I rocked the boat.  That would come to be a metaphor for my life as in the intervening years I have rocked many boats.

    My academic career started when I was five-years-old in the first grade.  I couldn't count but my neighbor could, so my success in the first grade was "borrowed" from him.  In the second grade, when I was six, I discovered that I couldn't see, and I was introduced to the world of corrective lenses.  My world became larger and clearer.

    When I was ten, I attended 4-H camp at Camp Grant Walker.  I was awarded the outstanding camper only because I could work harder and longer than anyone else.  This was the second seminal moment which would define my life.  I learned, you don't have to be very bright, if you are willing to work hard, and if you are willing to keep up the hard work up over a long period of time.

    At twelve, I started high school, which at that time was the 8-12 grades.  In math class, I had my third seminal moment.  The teacher publicly told each student what he thought about them.  Before the entire class, he said to me, "Larry, you'll never be a leader.  You'll always do what other people tell you to do."  All of my life, I have worked to lead, direct and drive progress and development wherever I worked.  In 2012, the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) named me a "Change Agent." Earning that designation required  me "rocking the boat," working harder than anyone, and setting the pace, the direction and the goals everywhere I worked. . 

    As a seventeen-year-old, I started Texas A&M College in pre-veterinary medicine.  In October 1961, I trusted Jesus Christ as my personal Savior, an experience which would define the rest of my life.  In 1986, I repeated that history to a public meeting in Beaumont.  A lady in the audience turned to the young woman sitting next to her and said, "That's the most disgusting thing I have never heard."  The young woman said, "I know, that's my Daddy!"

    In 1962, at eighteen and a sophomore at Northwestern State College, I saw the "girl" who would change my life.  I met her shortly after that.  That "girl," Carolyn Ann Bellue Holly, sits here tonight as my wife of nearly fifty-four years.  At twenty, I spend the summer in Kenya, East Africa and in October 1964 spoke to 2,000 students at the state Baptist Student Union Convention.  I addressed civil rights and racial prejudice.  My message was not well received.

    In May 1965, Carolyn and I graduated from NSU and in August 1965, we married and started the adventure which would lead us to this evening.  Just saying these words brings a smile and joy to my heart.  Through the years, upon occasion Carolyn would say, "Sometimes it's not easy being your wife;" to which I would respond, "Sometimes it's not easy being me."  Other than my experience of personal salvation, our marriage is the most important, significant and rewarding experience of my life.  And, our alma mater, where we met and fell in love, to this day is an important part of our lives.

    While a graduate student at Baylor, Carolyn and I decided to go to Medical School.  At that time, it never occurred to me that we would not be successful, but looking back now, I realize how improbable even acceptance to medical school could be.  We graduated in 1973, having had both of our children in those four years.  UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine has been and remains a central place in our lives.  It may sound strange to some for me to say that "we" graduated, but we did it together.  Carolyn sat on a stool and read late at night when I was dissecting a cadaver.  She worked and made our home while "we" went to school.

    In 1975, we moved to Beaumont.   We have never thought about leaving Beaumont and in fact we have our family cemetery plot designed and paid for, so we will never leave.  Not surprisingly, when we were invited to join the Country Club, we asked if African Americans and Jews could join. 

    After twenty-two years in solo practice, Drs. Wilson, Finley and I founded Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP.  Over the next twenty-three years August 1, 1995 to November 29, 2018 -- through thick and thin, we built a premier multi-specialty medical practice and help lead the transformation of healthcare in America.

    Like other innovators and transformers, we pioneered electronic medical records, the application of analytics to healthcare and the adoption of the patient-centered medical home model of care.  We developed and built electronic solutions to the most complex healthcare challenges.  SETMA has been presented multiple citations for excellence in healthcare delivery. 

    SETMA has taken care of the most vulnerable patients and through the SETMA Foundation have supported the care of our patients who could hot otherwise obtain care.  It is these whom I think of tonight and for whom I hope the best in coming years.

    In the past nearly forty-six years, people have come and gone.  My mind races across the years remembering the people whom I have cared for and truly loved and who are not with us tonight.  Each one has enriched our lives and we are grateful for them.

    No matter the difficulties which have brought us to our present circumstances, nothing can rob us of the memories, experiences, joy and triumphs of these years. 

    I, as you, have often played the "what if" game.  "What if," this had changed, or, "what if" that had changed.  "What if" I had stayed at Texas A&M; I would not have met Carolyn" that would have been a tragedy.  "What if" we had moved somewhere other than Beaumont, our children would not have met their spouses, and that would have been a tragedy.  We would not have the eight remarkable young people we call "grandchildren" and they are "grand" and that would have been disastrous.

    I have always wondered, "What if" life were not like Solitaire.   What if the game does not turn out well, you could go back and make a different move and get a different result?   Unfortunately, as in Solitaire, in life there are no opportunities to try a different move and get a different outcome.  However, in the Holly family, there is no desire for any "what ifs."  There is nowhere, the Holly Family would make a different choice, not out of hubris or complacency, but out of contentment and gratitude.

    Tonight, I am grateful to God for my faith, my family, my friends and I am grateful for Beaumont, for SETMA and for the forty-three years we have spent in this community.  I would not change anything out of the knowledge that if we could change one negative experience, it would be at the expense of all of the good ones, which are overwhelmingly the nature of five decades.  If any change would mean not having known Beau, Hannah, Holly, Elizabeth, Emma, Kate, Richard Everett, and Wyatt, then thank you, no."  We will celebrate the life we have known, with the good, the bad and the ugly.

    But what about the future?  We don't know; but, we know the One Who does.  Carolyn and I will find a new way of relating as I will not leave home between 2 and 4 AM each day.  We will have a face-to-face relationship rather than telephone conversations and quick lunches.  I smile as I think this because for me that will be wonderful, but for Carolyn ¦well, "sometimes it's hard being my wife."

    We will have more time to spend at our undergraduate school, Northwestern State University, and at our medical school, UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine.  We will teach and write and visit.   We will read and write.  We will probably go to Lamar University and study French.  I would like to write a novel, or two, or three.  I wonder if each of you will recognize yourself.  "Let not your heart be trouble" as my memories filters conflict or difficulties and I remember only our best.

    The truth is, Jimmy Steward is not the only one who can confess, "It's a Wonderful Life."

    Carolyn, on August 7, 1965, we both said, "For better or for worse."  It may frighten you a little, but it is thrilling to me, to say to you, "Now, more than ever, I am yours, alone, for better or worse."  Due to the benevolence of our God, I know it will all be for "the better." 

    To the rest of you, I say, "Thank you for the memories."  We will always truly love you and be thankful for you.  The phrase, "God bless you,' is not a social custom.  It is a fervent prayer for you and all those you love, that the richest blessings God has in His storehouse will be yours today and for every day of your life."

    Farewell, dear friends and colleagues.  God speed to you.

    James L. Holly, M.D.

    CEO, SETMA

Index
  1. James (Larry) Holly, M.D.

    A difficult heart wrenching task

    As I prepare to make the biggest transition I have ever faced in my life, I am experiencing many "firsts" and "lasts."   Preparing to conclude a 46-year career of practicing medicine, particularly in the face of having to sign a five-year non-compete in order to protect the welfare of hundreds of people I deeply care about, this morning I face the need to fulfill a requirement of the Texas Medical Board which is to write a letter to all patients I have seen in the past two years notifying them of my withdrawal from practice.

    Through my career, I have written many such letters for others but it is different when I and my career I are the subjects.   Surprisingly, the stress of this task is not created by the noble, well funded and strong people in this number, they will be fine. I will miss them, but I don't worry about them. 

    The people I worry "for," and I mean "for" and not "about," are those who have special needs, or who are difficult to care for.  One of my roles in my practice over the years has been as a "last resort."   When a person had been dismissed from care by everyone else, I was the "last resort."  

    The following is about my first contact with one such person which started with the addressing of the fact that this was the end of the road. If they could not "get along with," or "cooperate with" me, they would have to find healthcare somewhere else.  Not surprisingly, some on my dearest relationships arose out of this exchange and challenge.  

    As I write this, a man comes to mind who is deceased. Just prior to my seeing him for the first time he was being dismissed from our practice.  Through the years we became close and I miss him. He had serious health problems but once you pierced the thin veneer of hostility and anger, he was a delightful man. 

    Dozens of faces come to mind as I write this and I smile.  One lady was a whiner.  One day, many years ago, she was in the hospital and began to whine "at me."  I said to her, "if you whine at me once more, I am going to strangle you in that bed."  (O.K., before I get a thousand letters objecting to this approach, I agree it was not ideal.).  Her response?   She stopped whining and said, "Doctor, can we discuss my condition?"  And, we did. 

    There are children with disabilities who are difficult to care for but whom I love. There are many who make me proud to be a part of a society which cares for and provides for people who have nothing to give except to give us the opportunity to love people who frequently are unlovely if not even unlovable.  

    I will write the letter, which fortunately is prepared electronically which means that the tears will not stain the paper.  

    Carolyn and I have been blessed.  And, I say "Carolyn and I, "because for many of you the excellence of the care you have received has been the result of her tireless advocacy for you for 46 years.
Index
  1. Carolyn Holly

    This is dearer and more professionally validating & heart warming than anything you have written so far.  And, yes, I merit your accolades of/to me; I did advocate for your dear people called patients.  We are a good team.

  1. Theresa Bailey

    Dr. Holly

    You are a great man that has accomplished many things.  I am at a loss for words.  I am not an eloquent writer, I cannot find the words to express to you my gratitude for your faith and trust.  I learned many things from you that have helped me through everyday life.  One being honesty no matter how hard it may be to say something someone does not want to hear. 

    With your guidance I have adopted a problem-solving algorithm:  Identify the problem devise a solution, present the problem and solution and be open to the criticism and /or suggestion.

    This has served me well in all of my many positions.  I serve as President of the Hamshire Music Boosters (what a job!), I am on the board of my local Texas Association of Sports Officials and Umpire in Chief of a local softball/baseball league.  I am also a trainer for new Umpires coming into our associations, I belong to 6 of these associations. 

    I take the lessons you have taught, some unknowingly, and apply them to everything I do. 

    I know your transition will be difficult but ¦ God has a plan to use you in ways you have not imagined. 

    You will be missed, and I hope we will be able to stay in touch as you have become part of my life in the past 18 years. 

    Your FRIEND,

    Theresa Bailey

Index
  1. Carolyn Holly

    Theresa, your words of honor and respect comfort.  Thank you for taking this opportunity to offer words of esteem & encouragement.

    The person that you have become, that you are assured that our life, our influence will live on.  You make us proud!n And yes, God only knows what is in His plan which is our future.

    We are available to & for you if you ever have need.

    This is a most difficult assault on our person; But no more so than Calvary on our Lord, who was a perfect man.  We are not, but it is hurtful none-the-less.

    Mrs. Holly

  2. Ruth Berggren

    Dear Dr. Holly

    My heart weeps with you for the circumstances of this parting from your practice, as well as for the loss and sadness you are experiencing. Last night we heard from Reverend Dr. Kenneth Kemp, a physician and senior pastor at Antioch Baptist Church. I wish you could have been there to hear him. He spoke at the conclusion of a lengthy community meeting held at UT Health in our academic learning and teaching center.

    We had heard about the continued rise of maternal mortality in the US despite continuing declines in comparable nations. We examined the disproportionate burden of this morbidity and mortality on black women and considered its root causes from all angles. We heard about support and treatment programs from experts on opioid addiction and about Dr Charlotte Guillory's Honey Child program in Houston churches. (Honey Child provides health education and wrap around social support for expectant mothers to decrease rates of infant prematurity and neonatal mortality.)  

    Dr. Kemp provided our call to action, noting that losing a wife or a mother or a daughter to childbirth is a condition of desperate pain , but in our nation it is also disparate pain. Offering the example of how songwriter Thomas Dorsey looked to his faith for divine strength in the face of desperate loss, Dr Kemp concluded remarks by telling the story behind the circumstances of this song:

    Precious Lord, take my hand
    Lead me on, let me stand
    I'm tired, I'm weak, I'm lone
    Through the storm, through the night
    Lead me on to the light
    Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home

    When my way grows drear, precious Lord linger near
    When my light is almost gone
    Hear my cry, hear my call
    Hold my hand lest I fall
    Take my hand precious Lord, lead me home

    The song was written in the setting of desperate pain. You can read the story here:

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.staugustine.com/article/20141106/LIFESTYLE/311069943%3ftemplate=ampart

    I the Lord thy God will hold thy right hand," Isaiah 41:13

    Dr. Holly-there is so much to be done in the world of ours and you have so many gifts. I am certain you will find much more light along your journey. 

    Your friend,
    Ruth

  1. Marvin Forland, MD
    Founding Faculty
    UT Health San Antonio Long School Of Medicine

    A difficult heart wrenching task

    Dear Larry,

    I write to you for two reasons. One to say I understand the emotional turmoil that can accompany retirement from the practice of medicine after a strongly committed and lengthy career, as I experienced it myself. However, as I wrote before, you are retiring to - you are starting a new journey which I hope will provide you new challenges, opportunities and satisfactions. I know my now sixteen years with the Center have been among the most satisfying of my career.

    Secondly, let me add my great appreciation for your most generous gift to the Bryant Lecture Endowment. Gloria Bryant was quite overwhelmed when I told her about it. The Lecture has continued to grow in interest and audience and we are particularly pleased at the active role the African-American community leadership is now playing in our planning and support.

    Ellie and I look forward to seeing you and Carolyn on the 28th.

    Best regards,

    Marvin

Index
  1. Carlos Roberto Jaén, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.A.F.P.

    My thoughts and prayers are with you and Carolyn as you face this difficult task.  It is hard for me to imagine when that time gets here for me.  May you rejoice in the knowledge that you used your talents for the benefit of those in need.  Their friendship, love and affection for you will last a lifetime and beyond.

     Thank you for your great example.

     With much respect and gratitude,
    Carlos

    Carlos Roberto Jaén, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.A.F.P.
    Professor and Chair of Family and Community Medicine
    The Dr. and Mrs. James L. Holly Distinguished Chair, Patient-Centered Medical Home

  2. Julie McClure - SETMA Nurse Practitioner

    I have no idea what you must be feeling. You have accomplished so much to be proud of and I know God has other plans for you too!  I truly wish you much happiness going forward.

  1. DR. CHRIS MAGGIO, President, Northwestern State University

    Doc,

    You are truly an amazing man blessed by God.  I hope you know how much I look up to and respect you.  I know that this is an extremely difficult time, but hang in there.  You have touched thousands of lives over the last 46 years and I know that you will continue to touch many, many more in retirement.

     Congratulations,
     Chris

Index
  1. Rubén Rangel

    Dr. Holly even in your emotional struggles you continue to inspire. I wish I had but a small measure of your intellect, faith, and greatness. Because of you, I try to be a better man. Remember all things will come and end and mostly not by our choice.

    You have done wonderful things as a physician. Your patients will never forget you. I struggled mentally and physically when I was forced out of my dream job. I know what you are going through.

    Time will help heal your wounds, but the hurt will never completely go away. Your life work will stay with you the rest of your life. It's okay to cry. We all pray for you and Carolyn. Stay busy and focus on other things. Remember we have a dinner date in Santa Fe. 😍

  2. Bryan Stephenson

    I've always admired your openness and honesty about SETMA and the reflections on your life. It seems like some of this post could be woven into your farewell letter to those you care for. It was always a pleasure when you rounded at Baptist, always with a smile and a joke, all peppy even though it was about 3:30 AM. Best wishes.

  3. From the wife of my dearest friend, Ron Fittz. who died over 30 years ago

    Larry and Carolyn, So surprised to hear you are "retiring" but hardly believe that word is in your vocabulary!

     It just gives you more time to minister as you have always done in your life. Our family has been truly blessed many, many times   

      In your ministry. (From milkshakes to monetary gifts thru foreign missionaries.) you will now have the time to double or even triple these ministries.

    "Retirement" has allowed us more time for family-our most precious ministry. I pray for more blessings for the two of you than ever before! Love the two of you greatly!

    Sherry

  4. Gary Voydanoff

    Dr. Holly,

    I hope you and your family are doing well.  I wanted to pass along my personal contact information below as July 31 is approaching fast and it will be my last day at NextGen.

    You've had an enormous impact on my personal and professional life these last 18 years at NextGen.  You helped build the foundation of this company in so many ways that it's impossible to list them all.

    As God unfolds this mosaic we call life I have no doubt he put you in my path for a reason.  I'm blessed to know you and call you a friend.

    I hope to continue to receive your  SETMA updates, I always enjoy reading them.  I pass some of them along to my son who has just completed year one of his medical school journey.  I still hope that he can meet you some day.

    As I move to my next professional challenge I hope that my travels will bring me to Beaumont.  Please stay in touch.

    In Christ,

    Gary Voydanoff

  5. In San Antonio for UT Health 50th Gala 

    Yesterday, Carolyn and I repeated one of our favorite journeys.  We reversed a trip which we made in August, 1975, when we drove from San Antonio to Beaumont, Texas.  We have always loved returning to San Antonio.  This is where our roots are. Carolyn commented this morning, "I could move back here."

    This morning, I read aloud my November 22, 1968 letter-of-acceptance to the 1969 entering class.  We both marveled that at that time, with only nine months before we had to move to San Antonio, I had 19 semester hours of science to complete.  Carolyn responded, "Only you!"

    Finishing the reading of that letter and as I read the name and saw the signature of F. C. Pannill, M.D., I smiled.  Almost five years later, the entire graduating class protested his signature not being on our diplomas.  I then showed Carolyn my "my little black book," which I produced between 1970-1973.  It was my attempt to bring to bear upon patient care "what is known," a process I carried to its logical conclusion in the design of an electronic medical record twenty-three years later.
    Today, the anticipation of the 50th Gala, feels me with joy. I am particularly delighted that this celebration will be led by the only man, William Henrich, M.D., I have known, whom I believe reflects the character, the elegance, the standards and the nobility of the founding dean.

    Carolyn and I love our school and we are grateful to all of those who made the Long School Of Medicine what it is today and that lists is long (no pun intended).  We are grateful for all who allowed us to be part of this history.  Thank you; it is not false humility for us to state that we have always felt unworthy of the opportunity and the career given to us.  Nevertheless, we continue to be grateful for both, and have worked with diligence and dedication to repay this debt of gratitude. 

    We look forward to tomorrow night 

    God bless you all,  
    James (Larry) Holly, M.D.
    C.E.O. SETMA

  6. In anticipation of the Long School Of Medicine and UT Health San Antonio 50th Gala - From UT Health San Antonio President Dr. Bill Henrich

    Larry,

    You and Carolyn are an inspiration to me and to your many friends and colleagues here.    I have told you many times that a priceless gift I will always treasure is the day our paths crossed.     

    To see your transformational success in Beaumont created after your time at our exceptional School of Medicine is a lift to our spirits.  

    You and Carolyn need to have a celebratory night tomorrow night --- you both have more than earned it.  I hope the evening meets your expectations.     

    With great respect,  

    Bill

  7. After Retirement Notice

    An awkward situation which arose after the announcement of my retirement with an employee being treated badly- note from executive leaders

    R.   .............your giving her the money.  It is so much a part of your character and your generosity in situations like this is so common that sometimes I believe I fail to mention them. I did not want to fall into complacency and not praise a man when he is deserving of it.  Thank you for defining the spirit that has governed this business for the last 24 years.  The three of us will do our best to follow in your footsteps and continue your work taking care of patients and employees alike.

    M.    Here here I totally agree. ..... was overwhelmed that you sent the money. I have witnessed your generosity over the years and am always impacted by your thoughtfulness 

    J.   Couldn't agree more.

  1. A worthy reflection at the end of my career by Joe Bill Holland, MD

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Your-Life-Your-Health/pdfs/Address-to-Freshman-Weekend.pdf

    Address to Freshman Weekend
    By James L. Holly, MD
    Your Life Your Health
    The Examiner
    March 29, 2007

    (Author's Note on March 24, 2007, the University Of Texas School Of Medicine at San Antonio this author's alma mater held Freshman Weekend to introduce the class of 2011 to the School of Medicine. The following is Dr. Holly's address to this class as the President of the Alumni Association)

    I envy you, but it is not your youth that I envy I envy that you are the inheritors of the experiences and achievements of the first 40 years of our School of Medicine and I envy that you have your lifetime to compound that inheritance. You are the recipients of the legacy and of the trust estate of two generations of students, alumni, faculty, administrators and staff of the University Of Texas School Of Medicine at San Antonio.

    Furthermore, you face the challenge and opportunity of a time when medicine has a greater capacity to change the lives, the health and the future of those to whom you minister your art than in any previous generation. You have a virtual tabula raza upon which to record your contribution to the history of your college and to the advancement of your profession.

    As you consider your opportunity and your obligation, picture the scene portrayed in Chariots of Fire, when the Master of Caius (pronounced "Keyes") College, University of Cambridge, speaking to the Freshman Dinner in 1918, said:

    "I take the war list and I run down it. Name after name, which I cannot
    read and which we that are older than you cannot hear without emotion.
    Names which will be only names to you, the new college, but which to us
    summons up face after face, full of honesty, and goodness, zeal, vigor and
    intellectual promise. The flower of a generation, the glory of England,
    and they died for England and all that England stands for and now, by
    tragic necessity, their dreams have become yours.

    Let me exhort you, examine yourselves; let each of you discover where
    your chance of greatness lies; for their sakes, for the sake of your college
    and your country. Seize this chance, rejoice in it, and let no power or
    persuasion deter you in your task."

    By 2011, you of the new School of Medicine will have laid the foundation for who you will be as healthcare professionals. You will have collected the experiences and the memories which will guide you in your quest for greatness.

    Hopefully, you will have learned the skills of collegiality and collaboration which must supplant the competitiveness which has brought you this far. It is sage counsel to admonish you: Seek greatness; not conquest; seek greatness; not surmounting others. It is in building and in participating on a healthcare team, and in working for the success of that team that each of you will have the greatest chance of greatness. Greatness is not
    defined by winning or by wealth; greatness is defined by honesty, goodness, zeal, vigor and of intellectual promise fulfilled in service to others.

    Hear and remember the words of Dr. Peter Senge of MIT:

    "Most of us at one time or another have been part of a great "team,' a
    group of people who functioned together in an extraordinary way who
    trusted one another, who complemented each others' strengths and
    compensated for each others' limitations, who had common goals that
    were larger than individual goals, and who produced extraordinary
    results.

    I have met many people who have experienced this sort of profound
    teamwork in sports, or in the performing arts or in business. Many say
    that they have spent much of their life looking for that experience again.
    What they experienced was a learning organization. The team that
    became great didn't start off great it learned how to produce
    extraordinary results."

    Recognize and embrace the debt you incur when you accept the opportunity of membership in the class of 2011 Watch another scene in your mind as in the movie, Saving Private Ryan, the title character, tremulously, now in his seventies, approached the headstone of Captain John Miller who gave his life that Ryan might live.

    In perhaps the most poignant moment in a great film, tears streamed down his face as Ryan plaintively said to his wife, "Tell me that I have lived a good life; tell me that I have been a good man." The sacrifice of others imposed upon Private Ryan a debt only a noble and honorable life could repay. Everyone owes such a debt to someone. The circumstances of that debt may not be as dramatic, but it is just as real.

    There are few gifts as great as that of the opportunity to be a physician. Caring for others has always been a sacred trust. It is a trust which should cause each person so honored to tremble with fear that he or she will not have lived worthily of that honor. It should cause us to examine our lives for evidence that we have been good stewards of the treasure of knowledge, skill, experience, and judgment which has been bequeathed to us by our university, by our professors and by the public which funded our education.

    What nobler calling could one have than the opportunity to collaborate with others in their quest for health and hope? The honor of trust and respect given by strangers, who share their deepest secrets, knowing they will be held sacrosanct, is a gift which exceeds any pecuniary advantage. The pursuit of excellence in the care of others is a passion which is self-motivating.

    Passion is the fuel which energizes any noble endeavor. It is what makes a person get up early in the morning, work hard all day, and go to bed late at night looking forward to the next day. It is a cause of great sadness that today's society is so devoid of true purpose driven passion. Sadly, many only vicariously experience passion through the eyes and lives of athletes, movie stars, or musicians. Yet, ultimately, personally-experienced passion and purpose are what make life worth living. Those of us who have been allowed the privilege of being physicians, can and should know the passion of a noble purpose every day of our lives.

    Never has there been a time when a physician's knowledge and skills could have more positive impact upon the lives and futures of others. Never has there been a time when the role of the physician has been more defined by the concept of "team," in which each participant - doctor, patient, family, nurse, clerk and others coalesce into a vanguard against illness and pain.

    Now, well into the last half of my career, I do not crumble by the headstone of one who has given his life for mine, but I do stand humbly before the cornerstone of my life as a physician. I stand there grateful to God, to my parents, to my wife and children, to my University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio, to my professors -- among many, Drs. Pannill, Taylor, Wesser, Beller, Fuller, Forland, Gold, Sears, George,
    Persellin and Cander -- to medical school class mates who challenged me with their abilities and drive. Each has contributed and continues to contribute to the passion and drive born of the honor of being a physician.

    The tale is not yet told as to whether you and I shall have been faithful to this great honor, but it is a responsibility which motivates me daily and which must motivate you. To our university and to all who have contributed to the honor of our being physicians, we say,

    "Thank you."

    Today, you begin accumulating a debt of gratitude which can only be repaid with your excellence in service to all who seek your medical counsel or care. As the President of the Alumni Association of the University Of Texas School Of Medicine at San Antonio, I
    welcome you; I applaud you and I admonish you. Under the leadership of our new Dean and of the faculty, your school will make you proud it is your responsibility between now and two thousand eleven and for a life-time afterwards, to make your school proud. In two thousand eleven, I shall purpose to return for your commencement and inquire as to how well you have pursued your chance of greatness.

    James L. Holly, MD
    President, Alumni Association
    University of Texas School of Medicine, San Antonio
    CEO, Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP
    www.jameslhollymd.com

    Wonderful speech spoken from experience, love, and passion...you passed the torch to these new doctors, and your imprint will be felt not just in Southeast Texas, but literally all over the world. Not many folks can say that.

    With great pride,

    Joe Bill Holland, MD

Index
  1. Doug & Judy Tomplait

    To the Best:  Dr. James L. Holly

    Dr. Holly, "It's not about the money all of the time."  You, Doctor, are living proof that a person can give "loving care" to others.  We are so glad to have Dr. James Holly as our primary care physician.  We tell others of your kindness and sincere services.  Your personal goy and happiness is contagious.  We hope all of your patients "catch it."  Our world and community is a "better place" because of you, doctor.  We appreciate you and your "caring spirit."    Dr. Holly, thank you for all the ways you make this world a brighter one, Cordially, Doug and Judy Tomplait Lumberton, Texas.

Index
  1. Dana Melancon

    I'm not sure if Charles Vessels was able to relay to you an accurate depiction to my response when he let me know of you wanting me to be a part of your retirement gala...and I'm not sure I can fairly do it through text.

    But please know that in all of my broadcast career, and over the hundreds of emcee jobs, judging events, and panels that I have been asked to be a part of, I teared up a bit when Charles said the kind things to me from you.

    I've been in Southeast Texas all of my life, and there are a select few individuals that I am in awe of. And you are certainly in the top 3. You were instrumental in my early years at Channel 4 in putting us on the map with the first state of the art radar.

    You have the unique ability to possess all of the grandeur of the biggest of dignitaries, and at the same time, you mix it up with me in the funniest of ways. I consider that to be the most valuable trait a man can have.

    I hope I'm relating my feelings accurately to you, because I respect EVERYTHING that you've stood for, and continue to represent. Even though we haven't talked on a regular basis like in years past, I've always had a feeling that I could come to you anytime and be comfortable.

    With that said, I so truly respect your friendship Dr. Holly, and you're right. You can't afford my fee. I mean, really, who COULD afford all of the awesomeness that I will bring to your event?

    C'mon. If you're looking for a "second rate" emcee, I can track down Jay Leno's number or Bill Cosby....well, he might be delayed a bit.

    Dr. Holly, If you would grant me a cup of coffee and some conversation every so often, that's pay enough. I'm truly honored that you thought of me.

    I'm here for anything that you need.

    Dana

Index
  1. Dr. Peggy Wolfe

    Good Morning Dr. Holly

    It was an absolute pleasure meeting you and Carolyn.  I could see that the two of you have a very special relationship many only wish they could have.  As Ann has already said, you are a remarkable man with so much wisdom about life and healthcare.  You've done so much and have so much yet to do.  I can only imagine how much you will miss your practice world but  I know you will find a way to impact the lives of many more in the future.

    Thank you for all your references! am planning  to read them very carefully as well as request a copy of the Fifth Dimension. Thank you as well for your generous contribution to our graduate program.  We are so excited to have been thought of by you for this honor.....

    Peggy L. Wolfe, PhD, RN
    Dean and Professor
    College of Nursing and Health Professions
    McNeese

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Your-Life-Your-Health/northwestern-state-university-commencement-address-2016

  2. Jennifer Leger

    Hi Dr. Holly,

    It was wonderful meting you, Carolyn, Pat and Brandon as well. Thank you again for the SETMA Foundation's generous gifts to endow a scholarship for nurse practitioners and for Brandon's education. Your thoughts on the gift of giving and the discipline of giving resonated with me and will stick with me throughout my career and life.

    Best,
    Jennifer

    Jennifer Leger ('06, '13)
    Planned Giving and Donor Research Specialist
    McNeese University Advancement
    Box 91989, Lake Charles, LA 70609

  3. Virginia Ann Warner 

    Good Morning, Dr. Holly --

    I thoroughly enjoyed meeting you and your wife Friday and want to again thank you for establishing the scholarship for our students. Nurses are fortunate that they can work while in school, but it is difficult for them to negotiate employment, family, and school responsibilities at the same time. Dr. Dilks and I plan to award the scholarship to a Texas student who has progressed to the clinical part of their education because clinical education responsibilities make employment more difficult during that portion of their education.

    I am awed by all that you have done in your life and think your NSULA commencement speech reinforces many of the values you shared with us at lunch. The NSULA students were lucky to have heard it.  As you were talking at lunch I thought of several examples of how McNeese students and faculty give back to McNeese as well. It is amazing that seemingly small contributions can grow so much over time.

    I have ordered The Fifth Dimension for some semester break reading. Systems thinking is important for health care providers at all levels to understand.

    Again, thank you. It was a pleasure meeting you.

    Ann Warner

    Ann Warner, PhD, RN. CNE
    Professor and CoCoordinator
    Graduate Nursing Program
    McNeese State University
    550 East Sale Road
    Lake Charles, LA 70609

  1. Reverend John Davis

    Do you recall that day many years ago back in your office on 10th street which I asked for us to become "blood brothers" (by having our fingers pricked and touching blood to blood)?  Shortly before this I had for the first time began genuinely to miss that I would never have "a real brother."  You smiled at my request, saying we already were brothers.  While I am grateful to God for the privilege to live long enough and well enough to develop some wonderful friendships, there is for me a profound sense in which you are in a category of one.  I treasure that; you are SPECIAL.

    November 4 is arriving this Sunday.  What a SPECIAL weekly day (Sunday) for you to become 75!  Genesis 12:4 allows us to know that Abram's great faith journey began at this age.  I write this because I believe God is offering the same thing to you ... a new beginning ... one that will prove to be SPECIAL indeed.

    The moment I learned in an email from you that there was to be a "divorce" between SETMA and you I began special prayers for you concerning this.  As the founder and chief human "father" of SETMA, your soul is intertwined with it.  I imagine that this "divorce" is even more like "death" for Carolyn and you.  I say this in terms of feelings.  How could you not feel under-appreciated ... rejected ... unloved by people whom you have received, promoted and helped to prosper?

    I believe, as you do, that God superintends.  He did not cause this, but He has allowed it.  AND He definitely know how to use it for good!  I promise you He would not have allowed this door to close without planning in His time and His ways to open a larger door for you.  SPECIAL!  To use the example of standing on a ladder, one where the step you have been on is giving way, God smiles and says "come up higher, My son"!

    I believe God has both MORE and BETTER for you.  SPECIAL!

Index
  1. History of Concert Grand Piano and Naming for Sara and Hugh Thompson

    Dr. Holly:

    Thank you so much for sharing your comments about your personal musical 'journey' and your role in helping Lamar acquire our new Sara and Hugh Thompson Steinway grand piano.  I felt especially privileged to be invited to the luncheon yesterday which brought together the primary parties involved in that project.

    It has been a joy and a privilege to have gotten to know your personality as well as your professional expertise in my regular visits to SETMA.  It was especially enjoyable yesterday to hear you share your story with the other guests. The Lamar community has benefited greatly from your generosity, but not as much as our region has benefited from the gift you have given the Golden Triangle in the form of SETMA.  It has been rewarding to watch its birth and growth under your stewardship.  Both Pat and I have marveled at your important achievements over the years, improving the lives of so many Southeast Texans.

    Our very best wishes to you and Carolyn in your future endeavors!

    Bob (and Pat) Culbertson

    Robert M. Culbertson, Jr., DMA
    Mary Morgan Moore Department of Music
    Lamar University

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Letters/dedication-of-the-sara-and-hugh-thompson-steinway-grand-piano

  2. Martha-Marti Rollo Leonard

    This note is from the daughter (Martha-Marti Rollo Leonard) of one of my mother's dearest friends.  Carolyn and I taught her at church when she in high school.  This was before Carolyn and I ever dated.  Her note is very perceptive. 

    She mentions Dr Robert Sills who was our physician for many years.  He and his wife were two of my parents' dearest friends.  Dr Sills was my ideal of a physician. 

    One weekend in 1974, I covered the ER at Natchitoches Parish Hospital.  At one point a car accident was brought in with 7 victims.  As I began triaging them, Dr Sills came into the ER. I was relieved, help had arrived.  

    To my surprise, he stood by the desk and watched.  I passed the test successfully dealing with all of the patients with no help. 

    When Dr Sills died, Mrs Jo Sills asked me to memorialize him.  It was a joy, a pleasure and an honor. 

    To be compared to Robert Sills by Martha is a great honor. 

    The Note 

    Larry, I read your post the day you announced your retirement.  I was surprised and a little sad.  

    You seem to give so much thru your practice.  I am sure many people are sad with the announcement.  

    I may be wrong, but feel this was not quite the schedule you planned.  

    I am positive the next chapter in your and Carolyn's life will be blessed. I wish at some point I could have been near enough to have had you as my Physician...

    you remind me of Dr. Sills...you gave it your all and more, both in your practice and in your private life. 

    I am privileged and honored to have had Carolyn and you as part of my life at a time I was struggling with just staying alive. 

    Your entire family has always been a valued part of my family. Bless you.

  1. John Vardiman

    As I start the week which will conclude with my retirement from the practice of medicine, I am reviewing many aspects of the past 46 years.  The following is a note dated February 14, 2013, from Dr. John Vardiman about his experience with SETMA and me.

    2/14/13

    I was 66 years old and wanted to practice maybe another 2 or 3 years.  I joined SETMA and stayed with them twelve years.

    SETMA was a shock.  First, I had to master the EMR (which to my 5 year old grandson would have been literally child's play) but to me was a major hurdle.  My brain and the" electronic brain" just seemed to have a hard time getting on the same wave lengthy. But Dr. Holly walked me through it and walked me through it over and over and finally I began to get it.

    One day, the computer fell out of its track and bounced off the floor and I thought to myself, "There you ungodly hunk of ceramic chips; I've finally killed you!"  It blinked green, stuttered, then blinked  blue - when I replaced it  in the rack it kept right on working (only a mild concussion) and I thought myself - "You can't kill them if you try!! 

    Well, truth is of course these are fantastic machines (damn them anyway) and they have helped make SEMTA what it is)  SETMA & Dr Holly are now recognized world wide (yes world wide) as an authority on EMR! 

    My first weekend on call at SETMA was cultural shock.  SETMA had about 6 docs then and there over  60 hospital patients!!  I'd been seeing at most 12 patients in a weekend call; so even with three SETMA doctors on call, I was seeing 20-30 patient on weekend calls - all of whom were very sick. 

    I felt like an intern again.  But medicine (always the jealous mistress) has you dutifully falling into line and pretty soon that "chore" became the joyful burden - (a burden only, I think, the physician can appreciate and understand.)

    Now, an American primary care doc, if he's going to make a living, has to see a minimum of 25 patients a day.  At this point in time, in the US, 10,000 people turn 65 years old every day, so the primary care doc doesn't lack for customers!

    Wouldn't it be nice if when you go to HEB to grocery shop and you're handed your bill of $50 you just hand the clerk $25 and say, that's what you get today thanks and good bye.  That's the situation today for the American doctor.  And if you don't like it, well you can to Truck Driver School at Lamar.

    It only cost $200,000 and eleven years of education after high school to get a medical license but it takes a full six months to get a truck driver license and a truck driver can easily make as much as the average primary care doctor makes.  I'm sure the hard working third world doctor would laugh at my pathetic complaining!

    Now Dr. Holly and D r. Wilson have created the only multispecialty clinic in Southeast Texas (something like herding a bunch of CATS)  and made it very successful .   I'm proud to be one of those cats.

    Dr. Holly. traveling for years to Boston and working with Joslin Diabetes Clinic, has had the Joslin Clinic make SETMA its SE Texas s affiliate -- a truly remarkable feat.  The Joslin Clinic is considered the world's best diabetes care clinic.  What an honor for all of us is SETMA.

    SETMA made me a better doctor and a better person.  Dr. Holly has set the bar high for himself and we all have had to stretch every day to try to hurdle that bar.

    SETMA has cared for me as if I were the aged patriarch, though, through my wife's' three critical illnesses, through my amputation episode.  They have been extremely generous with me, all the while heaping upon me more respect and esteem than I deserve.

    Thank you, Dr. Holly and SETMA.
Index
  1. Final Draft of Dr. Holly's Address on November 29, 2018 at Retirement Dinner

    (note added - before I begin, let me say, with the Presidents of the UT Health Science Center in San Antonio and of Northwestern State University sitting here,  "If I had to choose between the Distinguished Alumnus Awards both have given me, and hearing my wife's words, I would choose to have a wife who could and would say such things about me."  Thankfully, I don't have to make that choice and I say unashamedly and publicly, "Carolyn, I love you and thank God for you."

    Valedictory is a farewell address on an occasion of "leave taking," but, what do you say when you stand before people with whom you have shared life for twenty-four to seventy-five years?  As I look around this room, I see hundreds of people who are dear to Carolyn and to me and, yet, you are also representative of many thousands who have contributed to our lives.  

    I see the Cowards and the Collins, dear friends and patients.  I see the Stones and I see Lanell, with whose husband, Mark, I started SETMA. I see the four ladies - Rebecca, Cheri, Sandra and Conteaka -- who have staffed my clinic and collaborated in the care of patents.  And, I remember those who preceded them in the practicing of medicine. 

    I see my family and close personal friends who have shared the joys and heartaches of the past 43 years.

    It is impossible to name each one, although in the coming years, many of you will be written about. 

    The good news is that even though our professional status is changing, our personal relationships will continue. 

    I want to thank each one of you for honoring Carolyn and me with your presence tonight.  I am tempted to start naming you, but that would inevitably overlook many who are important to our story.

    Therefore, I resist the temptation and silently thank God for each one of you.

    As I stand here on the occasion of my "leave taking," I remember seminal moments in my life. 

    • I don't remember the first time I met my mother and father - I was very young - but my first memories of them were the same as those I have years after their deaths.  They were wonderful and bigger than life to me.

    • I remember how my life was defined by an experience in 1947 when I was four-years-old.  My father borrowed a wooden boat and we went fishing on Little River in Central Louisiana.  There were four of us and only three seats, so as the youngest, I sat in the bottom of the boat. 

      I did as any four-year-old would do, I rocked the boat.  That would come to be a metaphor for my life as in the intervening years I have rocked many boats.

    • My academic career started when I was five-years-old in the first grade.  I couldn't count but my neighbor could, so my success in the first grade was "borrowed."  In the second grade, when I was six, I discovered that I couldn't see, and I was introduced to the world of corrective lenses.  My world became larger and clearer.

    • When I was ten, I attended 4-H camp at Camp Grant Walker.  I was awarded the outstanding camper only because I could work harder and longer than anyone else.  This was the second seminal moment which would define my life.  I learned, you don't have to be very bright, if you are willing to work hard, and if you are willing to keep up the hard work over a long period of time.

    • At twelve, I started high school, which at that time was the 8-12 grades.  In math class, I had my third seminal moment.  The teacher publicly told each student what he thought about them.  Before the entire class, he said to me, "Larry, you'll never be a leader.  You'll always do what other people tell you to do."  All of my life, I have worked to lead, direct and drive progress and development wherever I worked. 

      In 2012, the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) named me a "Healthcare Change Agent." Earning that designation required me "rocking the boat," working harder than anyone, and setting the pace, the direction and the goals everywhere I worked.

    • As a seventeen-year-old, I started Texas A&M College in pre-veterinary medicine and experienced my fourth seminal moment.  October 10, 1961. I trusted Jesus Christ as my personal Savior, this would define the rest of my life. 

      Twenty five years later, in 1986, I related that history to a public meeting in Beaumont.  A lady in the audience turned to the young woman sitting next to her and said, "That's the most disgusting thing I have never heard."  The young woman said, "I know, that's my Daddy!

    • In 1962, at eighteen and a sophomore at Northwestern State College, I saw the "girl" who would change my life.  Over the next several months we became good friends. 

      That "girl," Carolyn Ann Bellue Holly, sits here tonight as my wife of nearly fifty-four years. 

    • At twenty, I spent the summer in Kenya, East Africa and in October, 1964 spoke to 2,000 students at the Baptist Student Union Convention.  I addressed civil rights and racial prejudice.  My message was not well received.

    In May 1965, Carolyn and I graduated from NSU and in August, we married and started the adventure which would lead us to this evening. 

    Just saying these words brings a smile to my face and joy to my heart.  Through the years, upon occasion, Carolyn would say, "Sometimes it's not easy being your wife;" to which I would respond, "Sometimes it's not easy being me." 

    Other than my experience of personal salvation, our marriage is the most important, significant and rewarding experience of my life.  It is without exaggeration for me to say that it has been Carolyn's influence which has changed a relatively undisciplined and frivolous young man into what he is today.

    Northwestern State College, where we met and fell in love, to this day, is an important part of our lives.

    While a graduate student at Baylor, Carolyn and I decided to go to Medical School.  At that time, it never occurred to me that we would not be successful, but looking back now, I realize how improbable even acceptance to medical school could be. 

    We graduated in 1973, having had both of our children in those four years.  UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine remains a central place in our lives. 

    It may sound strange to some for me to say that "we" graduated, but we did it together.  Carolyn sat on a stool and read late at night when I was dissecting a cadaver.  She worked and made our home while "we" went to school.

    In 1975, we moved to Beaumont.  Invited to join the Beaumont Country Club, we asked if African Americans and Jews could join.  We were told that no one had ever asked that.  We responded, "We're asking." 

    After twenty-two years in solo practice, Drs. Wilson, Finley and I founded Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP.  Over the next twenty-three years - August 1, 1995 to November 29, 2018 -- through thick and thin, we built a premier multi-specialty medical practice and helped lead the transformation of healthcare in America.

    Like other innovators and transformers, we pioneered electronic medical records, the application of analytics to healthcare and the adoption of the patient-centered medical home model of care.  We developed and built electronic solutions to the most complex healthcare challenges. 

    As a result, SETMA has been presented multiple citations for excellence in healthcare delivery.  SETMA remains the only practice in America which simultaneously held accreditation for Ambulatory Care and Patient-Centered Medical Home by all four organizations which offer such accreditation.

    With EMR and electronic patient management, SETMA has taken care of the most vulnerable patients and through the SETMA Foundation has supported the care of our patients who could not otherwise obtain care.  Tonight my hope is that these needy and noble people will continue to find excellent care in coming years.

    In the past nearly forty-six years, people have come and gone.  My mind races across the years remembering the people whom I have cared for and truly loved, and who are not with us tonight.  Each one has enriched our lives and we are grateful for them.

    No matter the difficulties which have brought us to our present circumstances, nothing can rob us of the memories, experiences, joy and triumphs of these years. 

    And, nothing should rob us of a grateful spirit for the years the partners and staff of SETMA have given me the opportunity to create a laboratory of excellence in healthcare delivery. 

    Through difficult times over the past three years, SETMA partners and staff have kept faith with those who have entrusted us with their health. 

    And, through the compassionate spirit evidenced by the SETMA Foundation. through lean times, the partners and staff continued to support generously the needs of this community, often in the face of their own unmet needs.


    I, as you, have often played the "what if" game.  "What if," this had changed, or, "what if" that had changed.  "What if" I had stayed at Texas A&M; I would not have met Carolyn - that would have been a tragedy.  "What if" we had moved somewhere other than Beaumont, our children would not have met their spouses, and that would have been a tragedy.  We would not have the eight remarkable young people we call "grandchildren" - and they are "grand" - and that would have been disastrous.

    "What if" life were not like Solitaire.   What if, if the game does not turn out well, you could go back and make a different move and get a different result?   Unfortunately, as in Solitaire, in life there are no opportunities to try a different course and get a different outcome. 

    In the Holly family, there is no desire for any "what ifs."  There is no change the Holly Family would make a different choice, not out of hubris, or complacency, but out of contentment and gratitude.

    Tonight, we are grateful to God for our faith, our family, our friends.  We are grateful for Beaumont, for SETMA and for the forty-three years we have spent in this community.  I would not change anything out of the knowledge that if we could change one negative experience, it would be at the expense of all of the good ones, which are overwhelmingly the nature of our last five decades. 

    If any change would mean not having known Beau, Hannah, Holly, Elizabeth, Emma, Kate, Richard Everett, and Wyatt, then, "Thank you, no."  We will celebrate the life we have known, with the good, the bad and the ugly.

    But what about the future?  We don't know; but, we know the One Who knows. 

    Carolyn and I will find a new way of relating as I will not leave home between 2 and 4 AM each day.  We will have a face-to-face relationship rather than telephone conversations and quick lunches. 

    I smile as I think this because for me that will be wonderful, but for Carolyn...well, "sometimes it's hard being my wife." 

    Carolyn and I have been blessed.  And, I say "Carolyn and I, "because for many of you the excellence of the care you have received has been the result of her tireless advocacy for you for 43 years.

    We will have more time to spend at Northwestern State, and UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine.  We will teach and visit.   We will read and write.  I will probably go to Lamar University and renew by study of French which was suspended 55 years ago. 

    I would like to write a book or a novel, or two, or three.  Each of the previous comments in this address have a story behind them.  I would like to tell those stories partially to help others learn how to tell their stories. 

    I wonder if you will recognize yourself in my stories.  Surely the statutes of limitation have run on most of them.  But you are safe as my memories filter conflict or difficulties, and I remember only the best.

    Jimmy Steward is not the only one who can confess, "It's a Wonderful Life."

    Carolyn, on August 7, 1965, we both said, "For better or for worse."  It may frighten you a little, but it is thrilling to me, to say to you, "Now, more than ever, I am yours, alone, for better or worse."  Due to the benevolence of our God, I know it will all be for "the better." 

    To the rest of you, I say, "Thank you for the memories."  We will always truly love you and be thankful for you. 

    The phrase, "God bless you,' is not a social custom.  It is a fervent prayer for you and for all those you love.  It is a prayer that the richest blessings God has in His storehouse will be yours today and for every day of your life."

    Farewell, dear friends and colleagues.  God speed to you. 

    Together we continue our journey.  In different circumstances for sure, we continue our journey, but it certainly will be together.

    James L. Holly, M.D.
    CEO, SETMA   
Index
  1. 11.27.2018 Note from J. Parker

    Dr. Holly, I know it's tough to have "retirement" looming because it's not on your terms. Despite that, I know that you will seize the opportunity to redefine your plans and that there are great times ahead for you and Carolyn.

    It's a privilege to work with you and to have been along for the ride with SETMA. Hope you realize your worth and how appreciated you are,

    See you Thursday, Jane

  1. Last Patient Mr. Hill

    This is Mr. Tim Hill. He is 98 years old and a delight. After 46 years of practicing medicine, Mr. Hill is the last patient I saw. I have his and his daughter's permission to post this.

    I will be doing things for patients and the practice between now and when the practice is sold but I will not be scheduling patients daily. 

    When the sale goes through or the end of the year, whichever occurs second, my retirement will be done.

    It is a delight that Mr. Hill was last.  He is a fine man.  I will miss him.

    Mr. Hill My Last Patient

    Mr. Hill My Last Patient

    Mr. Hill My Last Patient
Index
  1. Carolyn Ann Bellue Holly Retirement Celebration Address November 29, 2018

    Alert Alert Alert!
    It's the WIFE!


    And as it should be, the dynamics in business associations are similar to marriage. You don't always agree; you don't always like each other, but you work hard toward a common good.

    So as the wife, I have not been a casual observer.

    That being said, tonight this has been a worthy tribute!

    From my standing, I have seen the good, the bad, and now, the ugly.

    Any married couple here this evening would not try to portray their marriage, any marriage, as all roses & chocolates. Who would believe that?

    So with all the beautiful accolades of this evening and recent days from around the world , and, I re-iterate worthy praise, has poured in; I would not insult integrity by portraying that all has been rosy.

    It has not been. There have been heart-wrenching obstacles of natural disasters, legal disasters, betrayal, crippling government regulation, personal disasters, death of a founding partner to cancer, to name a few.

    But I have noted and commended your unity of purpose and determination. I was impressed and proud of you as you walked together through the matter-at-hand. And many times at crippling expense. You went w/o your own salaries in order to care for your employees and continued to work for the good of your patients. You carried on, undaunted in purpose.

    That being said, I would like to give a few thoughts tonight on the "F" word!!

    Bet that gets your attention!!.!!

    The single most asked question of me as we have travelled around the speaking circuit of healthcare policy, medical home and informatics in management of healthcare, has been, "How do you keep up with him!" 

    My reply, "I don't!"

    There is a phrase we have heard: "He's a force to be reckoned with.""

    So the "f" word is force!

    The definition is: a push or pull upon an object. Whenever there is an interaction between two objects there is a force upon each of the objects. Forces only exist as a result of an interaction.

    Let's think a moment about that word.  There is force for good, force of nature, evil force, like hate, jealousy, greed, love of money which Scripture tells us is the root of all evil.  And we all know too well the destructive force of a hurricane and of water.

    There is a force for good like friendship, brotherly love, the redemptive force, the creative force... You get the idea. This is not an exhaustive rendering.

    There are external forces and internal forces. It is an external force that brings us to tonight.

    This was not of our choosing. I have my understanding of the forces at play that brought us here, tonight. You can have your own.

    • So what is the driving force of a man who rises to make rounds at 2:30 in the morning?

    • What is the force of the man who will take a 350+ page book and read it in a week-end and condense it to a software template to better facilitate management of a patient's care and to be better reimbursed for that care?

    • What is the force behind the man who reduces his own salary by 60% in order to care for employees and partners, potentially risking the financial stability of his own family for others?

    • What is the force of a man when gifted $200,000 by a wealthy businessman whom he met around SETMA-related affairs, refused to take the money for his personal enrichment, but insisted it be put in coffers of all partners? He never wanted any hint of impropriety.

      That is a rare man!

    • What is the force of the man who comes up with the mantra for SETMA: "Healthcare where your health is our only care."

      I used to tell everyone, "if you are a patient you want him as your advocate. Because I have seen him not care about who he offended in order to get what was needed for the patient.

      That is the force of a man who is not self-serving. That's the force of a man who looks to the needs & cares of others to his own hurt.

      The Psalmists says of the righteous man: "He swears to his own hurt and changes not." Once he's made the commitment, he stands by it, no matter his bottom line.

      That's the force behind this man.

    It is the force of integrity, commitment, fidelity, passion, a clear conscience.

    That is the force from within; that is the force of character. That is a man you can trust & follow, who seeks for the good of others.

    That is why I declare this is a meritorious tribute.

    From where I stand before you tonight, I have walked through every step of this. I know of what I speak.

    The Bible says that our lives are "an epistle written and read of all men. Written not with ink on tables of stone, but by the spirit on fleshly tables of the heart."

    So, Larry, tonight you have heard some of the readings of your life as told by others. (Ref. Old television show, "This is your life!" This is your life as read & told by others.

    We live in the day where story telling is encouraged. I would dare to say every person in this room is a story of our life.

    Larry, without doubt, the epistle of your life, your story will live on and impact others for good.

    So I say to all of you, people are reading your life. Words are cheap, saying the right things are not the epistle of one's life. It is the living, the deeds done.

    Winston Churchill said it best:

    "You make a living by what you get;
    You make a life by what you give."

    This man gave you his all.

    So with the force of our internal character, we will reckon with this forced retirement, just as we have lived our life, with honor, integrity,

    So to all of you, I adjure you to choose well because your epistle is being written and read.

    Larry, as your wife, I stand to your honor; I stand in agreement; I stand in affirmation with all that has been said.

    To all of you, May God bless you. And may the force for good, righteousness and peace be with you.

    Larry, the only thing that could make this harder is if you were not at my side.

    I leave you with a quote:

    "A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination. But when you add to that a literate tongue or pen, then you have something very special."   Nelson Mandela.

  2. Responses to Carolyn’s Address at Retirement

    Sherry Fittz — Beautiful tribute to you and to Carolyn. We look forward to enjoying the rest of the epistle being written. May God continue to bless the two of you. We will have lunch soon!

    Reuben Rangel — Very well said. Carolyn did an outstanding job describing you and your work ethic, when most of us think it but can’t find the words to describe you. Congratulations on your retirement. Dante told me it was a beautiful event. Sorry o couldn’t make it. Jesus is calling my mother home. She woke me up early with her pneumonia cough. She’s asleep now after my attention. God bless you and Carolyn. You all are wonderful.

    Janice Hebert — carrie told us what an eloquent speech you gave and how proud she was. I just read it and I must say she was right and I am not surprised ! May God bless you both on the next chapter of life. Love😘

    Kelly Darden — Mrs Holly is a lovely eloquent and elegant lady. Her love for you, your children and for SETMA was evident in her speech last night.

    Carolyn’s Response to Kelly Darden  — We have all walked through good & bad things together, caring for each other.  That makes a bond of friendship.  Thank you Kelly  for sharing our special evening with us.

    Sylvia Kerl — That’s one very special lady you have Dr. Holly! Her love for you is apparent to anyone that has ever watched her look at you - this speech put that “look” into words. Beautiful!

    Norma Duncan — Nothing to add except I give thanks to you both and love you both.  Currently in Mandela country and he and all South Africans would be proud to here you quote him! Laura Duncan says you are also a “force” Carolyn Holly

    Math Ramirez — Powerful message provided by Mrs Holly and yourself Dr James L. Holly .. Love you both and wish the Best on your new chapters in your Life!

    Brandon Sheehan — I did not dare get the microphone because I did not think I would be able to keep my composure. The one thing I would say from my heart is thank you. Thank you both for so many things. Your leadership , your guidance, your example, your dedication, your generosity, and thanks for all the choices you made that created the leader you are and the friend you have become. I am a better man having known both of you.

    Jannette Aaron  — Beautiful words to a beautiful soul. You and Carolyn are the “force” inside your family and your family at work   So proud to call you both friends!

    Carolyn’s response to Jannette — You have great insight!  You read our souls accurately.

    Alicia Horn Daleo — We are in New York City and I listened yesterday to people discussing your pioneer-ship of Medical Home.    I am proud to have worked with you! And Mrs Holly is a gracious lady!

    Carolyn’s Response to Alicia — We value you, Alicia.  You bring credit & value to us & healthcare.

    Pat McNeel — Know your proud of your wife, so thankful we got to know you, you were our great doctor, ya'll enjoy your your time together now, God Bless.

    Willie Dell Weaver Boswell — A beautiful and eloquent speech from her heart. I’ve personally never met another doctor more caring and committed than you. I will continue to pray for God to direct your path forward.

    Charles Daleo — It has been an honor and privilege to be a part of the SETMA family.

    Laura Forester— I was stunned at how thoughtful and well written it was as well as how well spoken she was!  I thought you had amazing talent with your writing and speaking, but I think she may have even surpassed you in my mind!  The way you both honored each other made me proud to know you both and proud that your marriage represents your faith so very well.  Unbelievably well done,  Mrs Holly!!

    Dr Holly — Laura Scott Forester I agree

    Mary Lee — Beautiful words.  Best wishes to you both!  XX

    Elizabeth Key — Carolyn, well said!  Excellent speech!

    Judy South — That was so beautiful. I don’t know what you two are going through but I do know our God is walking with you and He has a plan. Walk through the fire of trials with Him and you will come out on the other side with Him. What a wonderful celebration last night must have been. I remember well your care of physical and spiritual needs as we served at NEBC and as we walked through some difficult fires and you were there for us. When our son had a serious health issue and with prayer, compassion and leading us to the help he needed he is now a healthy and successful young man. Force and compassion both describe you. Carolyn quoted Winston Churchill and I have another quote from him to you. “Never never never never give up.

    May God shower you and Carolyn with His richest blessing

    Paula Davis — Very well done, Carolyn...I'll share with John.

    Dana Broussard — The love that each of you have for Christ, for each other, for our community and for all of those in need resonated with such passion last night. It is truly an honor to be in both of your presence. The two of you have made the world more kind and beautiful

    Kathleen Corley Massey — Whew! That said it all! Well done, Carolyn.

    J. W. Bill Phillips — Well written, lovingly delivered. My compliments to Carolyn....and to you, Larry.

    Chris Maggio — It was an amazing evening and such a wonderful tribute to you and your family.  Carolyn did a phenomenal job with her heartfelt remarks.  Thank you so much for including me in the ceremony.  Congratulations!

    Peggy Pitman — Well stated!

    Brenda Van Dyke

    Wow - Well stated.   That took courage!

    I hope you take this well - I don’t think Nancy Reagan is dead!  I always admired her for her strong unwavering commitment to stand with her husband during the good, bad and ugly, no matter the personal cost.

    You were brave and courageous to speak the truth.  Believe me - those words will resound in the minds of the listeners, for good or bad, for a very long time.

    For good, many will continue to say “Amen”, for bad, unrest because of their conscience, which can be a living hell.

    Now - go rest high upon that mountain, while you have breath and enjoy ALL that the Lord has for the two of you - and it is good!

    Thank you for allowing me to be part of your journey, prayer wise.

    Remember: God has you in the palm of His Almighty Hand. This is only the beginning of a very exciting and rewarding new journey for you two.

    Love you my dear friend.

    Kathy Moore

    Well I just read your speech from last night!! All I can say   is this... the Force was with you!!

    Beautiful words you shared and I totally can hear you as I read them! 

    As much as your beloved was honored and pleased, your Father was honored and pleased! 
    ❤️❤️❤️❤️..... Kathy 

    Great quote at the end! Mandela surely knew of a Larry Holly!! Surely he did! 😉

    Joanne Brown

    Thanks for last night – see my note on the back

    Dr. and Mrs. Holly,

    I have had dinner with Laura and George Bush, Anita and Rick Perry, had dinner at the White House with the Bushes, had a mass in Pope John Paul II’s private home chapel, followed by breakfast, has a private meeting with only us and Tom Harkin and Robert Shuler…Nothing compares to the speeches the two of you gave last night and the love you shared with me by inviting me.

    Beverly Burchett

    The lioness roared over Beaumont tonight! Your eloquence pleased our ears, your regality blessed our eyes, your dignity pierced the atmosphere--sprinkled with grace and honor..tonight you were a "force"! It has always been our honor to walk by your side, and you can count on us always. We love you both. I will give Charles your message in the morning.❤️

    Richard Smith

    Very well said Mrs. Holly. I could not make it to the event, but I will say this, Dr. Holly was like a big brother to me ! He treated me like a friend, more like a family member. The man went very far in helping me. We were so close we even had a couple of " tiffs" but would hug each other before my departure from his office. I do love him like a brother and will miss him immensely! As for you Mrs. Holly you were also so kind to me. I pray that I will see y'all again.

    I must say this also, I was treated very well by all at SETMA

    Mrs Faisal Anwar (wife of Syed Anwar, MD, SETMA Partner)

    Dear Dr. And Mrs Holly,

    Thank you so much for making us a part of your evening celebrating Dr. Holly, his life, his work and his accomplishments.

    Mrs Holly you looked beautiful and were elegant and eloquent on the stage but I wish I could have done something to take away the pain that I could hear in your speech and your voice.

    Dr. Holly, you are a true icon for health care. Everything that was said in your honor was a true testament to your character.  I know that SETMA and the health care industry will not be the same without you, but the legacy that you have created will live on forever.

    I wish you both nothing but the best.

    With love,

    Mrs Faisal Anwar (wife of Syed Anwar, MD, SETMA Partner)

    Dr. Holly - Retirement – December 8, 2018

    It has been nine days since our retirement dinner and it is twenty-three days before my retirement is finalized.   I have had a lifetime habit of processing things by writing. I have continued doing that for the past four months.

    Over the past several days, I have been surprised by an overwhelming feeling of joy and of positive expectations.   These feelings do not yet have a great deal of substance except in one case.

    I always have loved and enjoyed my wife and her company, but since and during medical school, I have been driven by medicine. Her tolerance of my obsession is legendary but now she is the full time object of my attention. I love it and I love her.

    I find that I am more relaxed and patient.  I have almost an irrational optimism about the future, not because it is delusional, but because it is not subject to attack by events.  I have a joy which seems irrepressible.  I have a joy which seems to bubble up and to overcome events.

    And, with a spirit which filters out the negative, my joy seems unfathomable.  Slowly my relaxation is filled with peace rather than ideas about my next project, paper or innovation.  And, my heart — my emotion — is comfortable with that.

    This also allows me to be thankful for the past 46 years without disturbance from recent events

    It will be interesting to see how this progresses. 

  3. Invocation by Reverend Charles Burchett at Retirement Dinner

    We have gathered here this evening to honor and express our appreciation for Dr. James L. Holly and his wife, Carolyn.  As I begin this time of honor and appreciation with prayer, I know that one of the best ways to honor the Holly’s is to honor their God, so I invite each of you to join with me now as I do that.

    Heavenly Father, by Your loving and merciful revelation to us, we know that You are Jehovah Elohim.  It is with great joy, in the presence of these witnesses, that I praise You for being the only One true God.  There is no God but You, Jehovah Elohim,  and Jesus is Your only begotten Son, THE Creator and Sustainer, THE Redeemer and King of all that was, is, or will be.

    I join with my long-time friends, I join with Larry and Carolyn in thanking You, Jesus, for being Lord and Master over, Friend and Brother to, and Savior and King for us, for many others here, and for millions of people around the world.

    Spirit of the Living God-Man and Messiah I thank You for teaching Your Word for decades to and through Larry and Carolyn so that hundreds of men, women, and children have come to know You and know You more.

    Holy Spirit, I thank You for building the virtue and character of the Lord Jesus Christ into Larry and Carolyn so they could demonstrate and display His virtue and character to their family, friends, neighbors, patients, co-laborers, and even to strangers.

    And, Spirit of Truth and Holiness, during this time of transition, which surely includes some uncertainty, I thank You for being their encouraging and strengthening Comforter.  As you number their days and order their steps, I ask You to give them many more opportunities to see hundreds more come to know You and know You more.

    Father, I also want pray for all who have come to honor and bless Larry and Carolyn tonight, and for all the partners and staff of the South East Texas Medical Associates.  So in their behalf I lift up to You the words of King David, a man after Your own heart:

    Heavenly Father, I ask You to give them grace so that they will personally choose to worship You with reverence, rejoice before You with trembling, and so that they, with love and honor, will bow their lives in submission to Your Son, Jesus, and faithfully take refuge in Him as Lord and Savior everyday. {Psalm 2:11-12}

    One more thing, Father, as Mr. Melancon administrates the rest of this evening, I ask You to bless him with wisdom from above that helps him continue to help us give honor and express our appreciation to the Holly’s.

    In behalf of all of us I thank You, Lord God, for blessing us with the unconditional love and faithful friendship of Dr. and Mrs. Holly.  In the glorious Name of Jesus, the Lord God Almighty, Amen!

  4. Response to retirement Party Holly/Henrich

    My note to the President of UT Health San Antonio 

    I am sorry that I did not get to bid you good-bye.   I think we got you away on time; I hope so. 

    I cannot tell you how significant your presence was last night.  I can only imagine the time, energy and resources your attendance required. It was a statement to my family, my community and my colleagues. 

    You will allow me to applaud Carolyn.  Her eloquence and sentiments were to me a crowning achievement of my life. I have always wanted to be my wife’s hero. Last night I felt that I was. 

    Dr Henrich, your gifts and presentation were wonderful. I was so glad that you had come to respect and admire Dr Pannill. Your analysis of the early years and of Dr Pannill’s career are greatly appreciated. I look forward to having a transcript of your entire address. 

    Your charming and winsome banter are endearing.  You are truly a great communicator. I am proud to be your friend . 

    The way you wove my experience with the Chancellor and the UT Regents was one of the cleverest things I have ever heard. Thank you for your kind remarks. I shall always be grateful for you being here 

    I will send you a copy of the video soon

    Sincerely 

    James L. Holly, M.D.

    From Dr Henrich President UY Health San Antonio 

    Larry,

    A beautiful and wonderful evening.     We were so lucky to be there.    Carolyn’s talk was so compelling and warm and truthful and a tribute to you and your marriage.

    I loved what you had to say — beautifully articulated.

    I’m still processing everything, but it was so memorable and lovely.

    Larry you are a exemplary person and physician.     It is a privilege of my life to be your friend and colleague.      I look forward to you and Carolyn coming over to see us often.    Bill

    Ps.    Mary and everyone else on our trip loved the evening!

  5.  Retirement Celebration From UT Health San Antonio President Bill Henrich 

    Richmond,

    It was a delightful and warm evening, and we were privileged to be there. Your Dad holds a special place in my heart. His alma mater loves him. And the remarks by your Mom and Dad were heartfelt and moving.

    Thank you for including us.     It was wonderful that we could come.   

    My best wishes to you and your family for a peaceful and happy Holiday season.   

    Warm regards,  Bill

    Sent from my iPhone

    On Dec 1, 2018, at 2:20 PM, Richmond Holly wrote:

    Dr. Henrich,

    I just wanted to tell you thank you for taking the time and making the effort to attend.  Your comments were delightful.  I have heard the story many times of Dr. Pannill from dad.  However, to hear it from someone who researched history to educate themselves on the facts opposed to living the events, it gave me a different perspective and made me realize how truly unique my father is.

    Also, I loved the Dumbledore quote.

    Thank you,

    Richmond E. Holly
  1. Mrs. Kris Doyle’s watercolors lord and our gift

    Carolyn and I were thrilled to receive an original of this watercolor from the President of UT Health at our retirement dinner. Below it is the story of the painting



    This magnificent watercolor of the renamed Joe R. And Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio was executed by Mrs Kris Doyle.

    The following link is to a letter to the Longs after the renaming ceremony. The letter identifies Mrs Kris Doyle as the painter of the magnificent watercolor of the renamed school.

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Letters/joe-r-and-teresa-lozano-long-school-of-medicine

    This is the letter I wrote to Mrs Doyle about her work.

    From: James L. Holly
    Sent: February 17, 2017 10:27 AM
    To: Doyle, Kristine
    Subject: watercolor

    Ms. Doyle:

    Attached is a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Long, which I have placed in the mail today.  I wanted to tell you how wonderful your watercolor is.  My wife and I have enjoyed fine art all of our lives and particularly enjoy watercolors.

    Your conceptualization and execution of the renaming of the Medical School is brilliant and excellent.

    Thank you for sharing your gift with us.

    Larry Holly

    From: Morrill, Deborah
    Vice President, Chief Development Officer,
    U T Health San Antonio

    Thank you so much, Dr. Holly, for this thoughtful recognition of Kris.  Her dedication is inspiring, and Mr. and Mrs. Long love the painting and have it proudly displayed in a prominent place in their home.  Kris has been a blessing to our university in so many ways, but this contribution of her talents was truly extraordinary!  It added a beautiful dimension to the Long Naming Celebration that really touched Mr. and Mrs. Long and all of us and meant a great deal to me as well.

    Sincerely,   Debbie

    On Oct 1, 2018, at 8:12 AM, James L. Holly

    Your work is excellent. I never tire of it.  By the way, I am a 49 year veteran of UT Health.  James (Larry) Holly, M.D.

    On Oct 1, 2018, at 8:08 AM, Doyle, Kristine M

    Thank you for your kind words. It was my honor to create this painting to celebrate our Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine and UT Health San Antonio. As a 41 year veteran of UT Health San Antonio, I have seen phenomenal growth and advancing sciences that have propelled our
    university to greatness. I am proud to be a part of it!

    Thank you again, Kris Doyle

    Kris Enders Doyle  |  Senior Director of Marketing
    UT Health San Antonio
    Office of Institutional Advancement

Index
  1. Rebecca Andrews Dr Holly’s Nurse’s Address November 29, 2018

    Good afternoon, My name is Rebecca Andrews and I have worked alongside Dr. Holly for the past 10 plus years as his nurse.  Throughout all of those years we have built a bond that makes me wish this day was not coming so fast.  Many days of memorable moments, laughter and joy.  One things for sure there was never a dull moment.  If you know Dr. Holly you know just what I mean. 

    There have been many times when your bossy ways have made us frown and complain, But after the dust settled we've always admired your persistence to push us again and again. As sharing these years with you I have grown and learned allot. You always taught us to work hard, meet deadlines, practice perfection and manage time.  Per Dr. Holly it needs to be done Right and Right Now. Lol..

    Today we are not saying goodbye to our boss who gave instructions.  Today we are saying goodbye to a leader who gave direction and a mentor who gave us inspiration. Thank you for all your support and encouragement.  Your contributions to our success are immeasurable.  You have contributed immensely to the company's success in so many ways.

     It is no gain saying that it will be difficult for anyone to surpass the good examples that you are leaving behind. You have accomplished many challenges as our leader but the biggest challenge of your retired life is about to begin, Finding something challenging to do. 

    Now all of those selfies that you have taken can fill the pictorial dictionary at the word Worthless. You have always laid all the rules in the office now you will finally be on the other side as your wife lays all the rules at home.  The time has come for you to Relax, Entertain, Travel, Indulge, Read and Enjoy.  Blessings on your Retirement.  You will be missed like a bad tooth ache that I once had... LOL.

Index
  1. Retirement Dinner Master of Ceremonies

    Content for Master of Ceremony
    November 29, 2018
    Introduction

    We are happy to enjoy the music of Dr. Robert Culbertson and the Lamar University Faculty Quintet.   Thank you for your excellent performance
    Tonight we are gathered to celebrate the lives and career of Dr. and Mrs. James L. Holly.  

    While your dinner is being served, I am honored to introduce these two remarkable people.  Here is what others have said about Carolyn and Larry: 
    Thank you for joining us for the Retirement Celebration for Dr. and Mrs. James L. Holly.  I have known the Hollys….

    Tonight, we will hear many things about Larry and Carolyn Holly.  We start with two quotes from colleagues in the medical community.

    From a Beaumont Physician

    ‘I can think of no one who has had more of an impact on Southeast Texas medicine than Dr.  Holly.  He has touched many lives, directly and indirectly...and that includes a former young medical student in 1978.  When God welcomes Larry and Carolyn into his permanent kingdom, he will most surely say, ‘Well done, my son, well done indeed’. I can only echo that Larry.  Congratulations my dear friend!” 

    Upon the endowment of the Dr. and Mrs. James L. Holly Distinguished Chair in Patient-Centered Medical Home at UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine, Mr. Ted Carpenter, Former President of Universal American Medicare Advantage Program, wrote:

    “Our organization works with thousands of physicians across the United States.  Further, we collaborate with dozens of physician leaders who dedicate themselves to organizing outstanding patient care by seeking new and innovative ways to improve the entire patient care process.  We are very fortunate to work with some of the very best physician leaders in the country.

    “That said, Dr. Holly is in a league by himself.  His energy, passion, and unrelenting commitment to improving quality of care is without equal in my experience.  He drives positive change within his practice and community, implements value-added technology to improve clinical outcomes, reads and write prolifically regarding clinical and public health issues and generously shares what he has learned with all interested parties across the United States.

    “Under Dr. Holly’s leadership, SETMA has been honored countless times for their innovation, technology and services to the community.  By far, however, their greatest accomplishments is the care and quality that each SETMA patient receives. They are the real beneficiaries of this extraordinary physician practice.” 

    Introduction of Carolyn and Larry’s dear friend who is pastor of First Baptist Church, Kirbyville.

    At this time, Reverend Charles Burchett, Pastor of First Baptist Church, Kirbyville, Texas, will lead our innovation and blessing of the evening and the meal.  Reverend Burchett and his wife Beverly have been dear friends with the Holly’s for 45 years.

    At 7:30 start the evening – invite everyone to continue eating. 

    First speaker – 3 minutes

    Rebecca Andrew

    In 43 years of practicing medicine, Dr. Holly has principally worked with three nurses.  Mrs. Patsy Bobo, Mrs. Kay McIlrath and Mrs. Rebecca Andrews.  All three are with us tonight.

    From 2007 to 2018  Mrs. Andrews has been Dr. Holly’s partner in healthcare.  There is no place where the partnership of team work between nurses, healthcare providers and staff have been more critical to success. 

    Mrs. Andrew will share her experiences with Dr. and Mrs. Holly,

    Second Speaker – 5 minutes

    Dr. Chris Maggio

    Carolyn and Larry met in 1962 as sophomores at Northwestern State College now University. 

    Larry was 18 and Carolyn was 19 years old. They graduated in 1965. 

    NSU President, Dr. Chris Maggio is with us tonight. 

    Also, from NSU is Mrs. Jill Bankson, Associate Director of Development

    Dr. Maggio will share with us his memories of Dr. and Mrs. Holly

    Third Speaker – 10 – 15 minutes

    Our next speaker is Dr. Bill Henrich is the former Dean of the UT Health San Antonio Long School of Medicine and for the past 9 years has been President of the Health Science Center. 

    Those accompanying Dr. Henrich from UT Health San Antonio and the Long School of Medicine are:

    Mrs. Deborah Morrill, Vice President of Institutional Advancement
    & Chief Development Officer


    Dr. and Mrs. Robert Hromas, Dean, Long School of Medicine UT Health San Antonio

    Dr. and Mrs. Carlos Jaen, Chairman of Family and Community Health, Long School of Medicine, and holder of the Dr. and Mrs. James L. Holly Distinguished Chair in Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Dr. Ruth Berggren, Director of the
    Center for Medical Humanities & Ethics at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio

    Mr. Patrick O’Hara, Senior Associate Vice President of Institutional Advancement

    Mr. Steven Reese, Director of Development and Alumni Relations, Office of Institutional Advancement

    Professionally and personally Dr. and Mrs. Henrich have been among the most influential contributors to the career of Larry and Carolyn. 

    Dr. Henrich will share with us his experience with Dr. and Mrs. Holly

    Fourth Speaker – Mrs. Holly 5 minutes

    Dr. Holly and Mrs. Holly have shared the last 54 years together and they were close friends for the three years before that. Carolyn and Larry were married four years before starting medical school and it is fair to say that they “went to medical school together,” 

    It is equally true to say that their 43 years of the practice of medicine in Southeast Texas has been together. 

    Dr. Holly will be the first to tell you that Mrs. Holly is an excellent diagnostician.  If you question that judgement, ask her who it was that diagnosed Dr. Holly when he contracted West Nile Virus in 2006.

    Mrs. Holly, we are eager to hear your comments tonight

    Fifth Speaker – Dr. Holly 20 minutes

    Dr. Holly’s career has spanned 43 years in Beaumont and a total of 46 years.  Tonight he and Mrs. Holly officially bid farewell to Southeast Texas Medical Associates which itself will soon have a new owner. 

    Dr. Holly will share his reflections upon 75 years of life, almost 54 of them married to Carolyn and the last 23 plus years at the helm of SETMA.

    At the end of Dr. Holly’s address, Dr. Henrich will need to depart for San Antonio.  Please do not leave at that time as the program will continue. 

    Closing – Invitation to public comment

    As the Founder and CEO of SETMA from 1995 to 2018, Dr. Holly, with the able collaboration of Mrs. Holly, the Hollys have led, nurtured and befriended many of you. 

    In this final part of this celebration, any of you who wishes are invited to take one of the microphones and briefly express your response to the career and lives of Dr. and Mrs. Holly

    If you would wish to comment just raise your hand or stand and a microphone will be brought to you.

    When there are no more comments or at 9:30 – thank people for coming and bid them good night.  If you choose you can invite a round of applause for Carolyn and Larry

Index
  1. John Vardiman

    Friday, November 30, 2018

    Dear Larry and Carolyn :

    Just a note to tell you how very much I (and I know everyone else) enjoyed last night’s beautiful evening.
    Everything was perfect.  The story of your journey was inspiring and I am so glad that not only you but your college and medical school representatives, patients, and friends put more wonder into your story.

    It’s been my honor and pleasure, and privilege to have been a small part of the journey, but more importantly to have been inspired by your lives.

    Sincerely and with love.  John

Index
  1. Deborah. Morrill

    Dr. Holly,

    My apologies for a slow response....I really enjoyed being with you and Mrs. Holly.....she is a remarkable speaker, and both of you made it such a special evening for everyone! We would not have missed it!  What you have achieved in your lifetime, to now, is inspiring, and I know the window God will open for the next chapter will be a great blessing to you and all of us who love you.

    You are so generous and kind. We truly love you and are so grateful for everything you and Carolyn have done for the Long School of Medicine and each of us.....and so many others!

    Sincerely,

    Debbie

  1. Mrs Faisal Anwar (wife of Syed Anwar, MD, SETMA Partner)

    Dear Dr. And Mrs Holly,

    Thank you so much for making us a part of your evening celebrating Dr. Holly, his life, his work and his accomplishments.

    Mrs Holly you looked beautiful and were elegant and eloquent on the stage but I wish I could have done something to take away the pain that I could hear in your speech and your voice.

    Dr. Holly, you are a true icon for health care. Everything that was said in your honor was a true testament to your character.  I know that SETMA and the health care industry will not be the same without you, but the legacy that you have created will live on forever.

    I wish you both nothing but the best.

    With love,

    Mrs Faisal Anwar (wife of Syed Anwar, MD, SETMA Partner)

Index
  1. Retirement – December 8, 2018

    It has been nine days since our retirement dinner and it is twenty-three days before my retirement is finalized.   I have had a lifetime habit of processing things by writing. I have continued doing that for the past four months.

    Over the past several days, I have been surprised by an overwhelming feeling of joy and of positive expectations.   These feelings do not yet have a great deal of substance except in one case.

    I always have loved and enjoyed my wife and her company, but since and during medical school, I have been driven by medicine. Her tolerance of my obsession is legendary but now she is the full time object of my attention. I love it and I love her.

    I find that I am more relaxed and patient.  I have almost an irrational optimism about the future, not because it is delusional, but because it is not subject to attack by events.  I have a joy which seems irrepressible.  I have a joy which seems to bubble up and to overcome events.

    And, with a spirit which filters out the negative, my joy seems unfathomable.  Slowly my relaxation is filled with peace rather than ideas about my next project, paper or innovation.  And, my heart — my emotion — is comfortable with that.

    This also allows me to be thankful for the past 46 years without disturbance from recent events

    It will be interesting to see how this progresses.
Index
  1. Chris Ingram, Cardiologist, Natchitoches, Louisiana

    Professor Holly, I would like to convey a happy transition.

    Please as you may have time now to think/reflect on all the lives you have helped , all the families including mine.

    My time with you came at a pivotal period . Without your broad shoulders and support I don’t know that I would still be here.

    You will always have a friend and admirer here in Natchitoches.

    Please enjoy the fruits of a long very accomplished career.

    Forever grateful,  Chris Ingram

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  1. The Citadel and Dr. Henrich’s Address at Retirement Dinner 

    Today, I listened to the audio file of Dr Henrich’s address at my retirement dinner. 

    {https://www.dropbox.com/sh/20wl8j4k6498jar/AADq8rZQzlWtIUL5RXfKrPK5a?dl=0&preview=Henridge.mp3). A transcription is being prepared. 

     I am again struck with the creativity and originality of Dr Henrich’s speech. I am having it transcribed so they the text and the video tape of the evening can be accessed from my website. 

    In his address, Dr. Henrich referenced A.  J. Cronin’s book, The Citadel, published in 1937.  In 1938, Robert Donat played the lead role in the movie of the same title.  Six years ago, I wrote an article about Patience-Centered Medical Home based on this book and movie.  See:  http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Your-Life-Your-Health/Citadel-A-1937-Introduction-into-the-Spirit-of-Patient-Centered-Medical-Home.  The movie was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Actor, Movie and Director.  

    The next year, 1939, Donat was nominated for Best Actor for his role in Good-bye Mr Chips.  Movie fans will remember that another actor was nominated for best Actor in 1939:  Clark Cable for the role of Rhett Butler in Gone With The Wind.  And the winner was:  Robert Donat.  In 1989, a musical version of Good-bye Mr Chips was released. The two versions were equally good. 

    There are two movies I would encourage every medical school student to see:  The Citadel and People will Talk (see http://www.jameslhollymd.com/your-life-your-health/medical-home-series-two-part-i-the-movie).  

    The following are links to additional information about UT Health and Dr Pannill:

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Letters/pannill-cander-taylor-1972-history-of-heroes

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Letters/ut-health-historical-summary-in-response-to-drs-henrich-and-berggren

  1. Richard Smith

    Hello my wonderful friend. I really apologize for not making it to your retirement party. My 28 year old niece passed away and I was shaken pretty bad, and one of my best friends son had committed suicide a few weeks before that. At the last moment I tried to find a ride but couldn't.

    Dr. Holly this cannot be the end of our friendship nor my friendship with the lovely Mrs. Holly.  You and Mrs. Holly mean more to me than you could ever imagine.

    Ten years ago you promised me that we would go to lunch together and I'm going to hold you to that. Either that or I'll show up at your house while you are in your robe eating breakfast. I'll wear mine also so you dont feel out of place.

    You see I am very close to figuring out where you live...I think !   I also want to see Mrs. Holly's beautiful flower gardens ! Don't worry I haven't been stalking y'all ! I just happen to see some of your photos .

    Dr. Holly I hope and pray that you know that I love and respect you very much my dearest friend, for you are like a big brother to me !

    The following tells Richard’s story

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/your-life-your-health/from-homicidal-threat-to-reciprocal-caring-a-patient-centered-journey

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  1. Rubén Rangel

    Dr Holly, the heart symbolizes your love for your patients and your medical profession. 

    It also represents the love - love your patients and friends have for you.
    You will not be forgotten.

    Rueben, Bea, Danella, Dante

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  1. Joe Bill Holland, MD

    November 29, 2018

    1978 seems like a long time ago, when we first met — Retirement was the last thing either of us was thinking about.  God has been good to both of us, and I give Him thanks for that and your friendship. 

    You have been the dominant leader and innovator of health care in South East Texas.  You have positively touched thousands of lives in Southeast Texas and abroad, and He is truly proud of you.

    I have treasured your advise, wisdom and guidance through the years and don’t think that will cease!  Thank you for everything!

    May He continue to bless you, Carolyn your family!  Job well done!

    Joe Bill

    PS:  I have something coming your way in weeks!

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  1. Dr. Holly’s Final Note to SETMA Staff
    December 21, 2018

    When I arose at 4:30 this morning, I realized that due to circumstances while this is only December 21, 2018, it is the last day that I will have as the Founder and Chief Medical Office of Southeast Texas Medical Associates to send a final note to the organization into which I have poured my life into for the past twenty-three years.  Carolyn’s mother is in the hospital following hip replacement due to aseptic necrosis.  On the 26th, we will move her to a Skilled Nursing Facility for further rehab before hopefully going back home.  

    As of the end of the day December 31, 2018, I will no longer be a part of SETMA.  My office is empty, everything related to me has been removed from SETMA, and as of the January 1 2019, I will no longer have access to SETMA computers, EMR, or offices.  There is nothing unusual about this but it is sobering and to some degree saddening.

    Everything that needs to be done has.  My new e-mail address will be jholly@Jameslhollymd.com.  Since the address www.jameslhollymd.com  will soon belong to another, the content which I wrote will be at www.jameslhollymd.com.  My cell phone number will be the same and my home number is listed in the phone book.  

    All required notifications of my retirement have been made and Carolyn and I have enjoyed a retirement dinner which could not have been better.  A summary of that evening will be found in the addendum at the end of this note.

    Summary

    As I leave, I wish to say to each of you and to all of you, I leave with no regrets.  We did it right and we did it well.  There are some experiences I would rather not have had, but as to those things over which we had control, I would not change anything It is my hope and prayer that all of you will have a future which will be equal to your past, or perhaps even better. 

    The Core Values Which Built SETMA

    SETMA has always been a multispecialty, multicultural, multinational, multiethnic and multi-faith organization.  I have always been respectful of this fact and have never allowed SETMA to be used for sectarian purposes.  In respect to one group, we have never allowed pork to be served at a SETMA dinner or meeting.  

    Nevertheless, on May 30m 1996, less than a year after the founding of SETMA, August 1, 1995, I wrote a “personal note” to the staff of SETMA.  This same message has been repeated publicly and in a published manner at least five times in the past twenty-three years.  

    Since that note was from me and it was designated as personal, I cannot think of a better way to end my time with SETMA than to make sure that everyone is keenly aware of who I am and of what I believe.  With that intent, please read the following. 

    Deuteronomy 8 was a favorite passage of our Lord Jesus Christ, as was the entire book of Deuteronomy. In verses 2 and 3, chapter eight addresses the importance of humility on the part of men. Verse 3 declares that that humility will lead men to understand the central place which the Word of God, the Bible, has in the life of the believer.  Deuteronomy 8 principally reminds us that it is God Who gives us the power to “get money.” Verses 11-17 state:

    “Beware that thou forget not the LORD thy God, in not keeping his commandments, and his judgments, and his statutes, which I command thee this day: Lest when thou hast eaten and art full, and hast built goodly houses, and dwelt therein; And when thy herds and thy flocks multiply, and thy silver and thy gold is multiplied, and all that thou hast is multiplied; Then thine heart be lifted up, and thou forget the LORD thy God, which brought thee forth out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage; Who led thee through that great and terrible wilderness, wherein were fiery serpents, and scorpions, and drought, where there was no water; who brought thee forth water out of the rock of flint; Who fed thee in the wilderness with manna, which thy fathers knew not, that he might humble thee, and that he might prove thee, to do thee good at thy latter end; And thou say in thine heart, My power and the might of mine hand hath gotten me this wealth.”

    Here is the beginning of the corruption of what any man has received, the pride of believing that he achieved it by himself, and in arrogance believing that he deserved it to begin with. Deuteronomy 8 concludes with the solution to this pride, which is humility. It states:

    “But thou shalt remember the LORD thy God: for it is He that giveth thee power to get wealth, that He may establish His covenant which He sware unto thy fathers, as it is this day. And it shall be, if thou do at all forget the LORD thy God, and walk after other gods, and serve them, and worship them, I testify against you this day that ye shall surely perish.”

    I personally wish to affirm that it is God Who has blessed me and my participation in SETMA, LLP, and to remember that it is “He that gives us power to get wealth.” And, I wish to acknowledge that the purpose of that wealth is that through God’s blessings others might see that living by God’s rules is good.

    As I have often told you, this is not a religious organization and you do not have to believe what I have said in order to be a part of this organization. Nevertheless, I do want you to know that the benefits which you are receiving through SETMA, LLP are a product of God’s blessing. I also want you to know that I believe that those benefits and blessings will continue as long as we do not forget the Lord in not keeping His commandments. For SETMA, LLP “keeping His commandments” means:

    1. Being true to the founding principles which in the corporate documents. 
    2. Being true to our motto of “Health Care Where Your Health is the Only Care.” 
    3. Being true to the associates’ commitment to “doing good while we are doing well.” 
    4. Humbly acknowledging those who have made us successful, that particularly being God. 
    5. Treating everyone with whom we deal, whether colleague, co-worker, client, customer, or company, with dignity, courtesy and kindness. 
    6. Avoiding profanity in both our language and in our “use” of others. 

    In SETMA, LLP, we have an opportunity to do something really important, which is much more than just making money. We have the opportunity to show Southeast Texas that respect for the dignity of every individual and a desire to do good for others are not inconsistent with prosperity. At strategic moments in this corporation’s life, we have prayed for God’s wisdom and favor. He has abundantly given both, for which we give Him thanks, and publicly acknowledge His grace and mercy.

    In a recent letter to the President of the Southern Baptist Convention, I said:

    “As a Christian business man, I am very sensitive to maintaining biblical standards in my medical practice. As the managing partner of the largest, private, primary health care group in Southeast Texas, I am careful to make certain that no activity of this partnership violates God’s standards, to the best of my ability. Our corporate documents include prohibitions preventing anyone in this practice from ever performing an abortion, referring a patient for an abortion, or recommending an abortion. We also have prohibitions against beverage alcohol being used in any meeting, gathering, dinner, luncheon, banquet, picnic, or barbecue sponsored by, paid for by or associated with Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP.

    “Southeast Texas Medical Associates, LLP maintains three standards of measuring any decision, all three must be met before we undertake any action. First, we ask the question:

    • ‘Is it legal?’ - this involves ethics. If an action is not legal, we need go no further in our evaluation; we will not do it. But, even if an action is legal, we are not yet at the point of decision; we move to the second step of our evaluation, which applies a higher standard. We ask the question, 
    • ‘Is it right?’ - this involves equity, i.e., is it fair to all parties. However, even if a decision is right, this does not get us to a final decision. Before we decide anything, we go one step further and ask the question, 
    • ‘Is it righteous,’ - this involves eternity. If it is not righteous, no matter how legal and right an action may be, Christians should not be involved in it. 

    If an action is not ethical, equitable and eternally acceptable, we do not enter into any business agreement. Thus far, God has blessed our practice beyond our comprehension.” 

    I pledge to you not to forget from whence our blessing comes. I pledge to you that I personally will continue to seek to conduct myself ethically, equitably and eternally, as I pursue the goals which we have established together. I pledge to you to bring no destruction upon your livelihood by forgetting that it is God Who allows me to be a part of what we are doing, and that it is He Who allows us to succeed.

    In conclusion, this is a very personal note. That is why I have signed it personally and not as the CEO of SETMA, LLP. I will never attempt to force my faith upon you. But, I would be negligent, if I did not tell each of you that no matter what you face, no matter who you are, Jesus Christ, God Himself, has the power and desire to give you eternal life, which includes victory over the trials of your life, hope for the future, and joy in all circumstances. Incredibly, all of this is available by the same act to which God has led me in these past few hours. It is available by humbling yourself, acknowledging Who God is, and asking Him to make a difference in your life.

    God bless you. It is my prayer today, as it is each time I sign your pay check, that your association with SETMA, LLP will be the best occupational experience of your life, and that it will be an experience which will encourage you ‘to come to Jesus.”

    Conclusion

    As I have thought of what I would and should say to you upon this occasion, I cannot think of any better way to end my association with each of you than to say to you, no matter how much money you make, no matter how long you live, no matter how notable you are, or how high of praise you receive from men, without a personal relationship with Jehovah God, in the Person of His Son, Jesus Christ, the summary of your life will be incomplete.  

    God bless you and I hope to hear that you do well, always.

    James L. Holly, M.D.
    CEO, SETMA

    Adjunct Professor
    Department of Family and Community Medicine
    UT Health San Antonio
    Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long School of Medicine 

    Associate Professor
    Department of Internal Medicine
    Texas A&M University
    School of Medicine 

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  1. Addendum to Final Note

    The following are the u-tube videos of the Retirement Dinner in four parts:

    Video 1 – Introduction, Invocation and Rebecca Andrews Address and the President of NSU’s address 

    https://youtu.be/wnlaY-yh4Xc

    Video 2 – UT Health San Antonio President Address and Carolyn Holly’s Address

    https://youtu.be/sSrRwLEn9Ac

    Video 3 – Dr Holly and the beginning of the public comments with David Stone, Muhammad Aziz, Rusty Mathis, Robert Culbertson, Theresa Bailey,

    https://youtu.be/qyZTZAUsMUI

    Video 4 Public Comment Joe Bill Holland, Carolyn Holly, Charles Vessels, David Parmer, Hannah Katherine McMahan, Carrie Holly McMahan, Mark Toups, Dr Holly about LaNell.

    https://youtu.be/aapZVjR-_Hc

    Most of the responses to Carolyn and me leaving SETMA have been collected into a document at the following link:  

    http://www.jameslhollymd.com/Letters/retirement-notice-and-responses.

    One response which has not been posted as of this writing is from Joe Bill Holland, MD.  On November 29, 2018, he wrote:  

    “1978 seems like a long time ago, when we first met — Retirement was the last thing either of us was thinking about.  God has been good to both of us, and I give Him thanks for that and your friendship.  You have been the dominant leader and innovator of health care in South East Texas.  You have positively touched thousands of lives in Southeast Texas and abroad, and He is truly proud of you.  I have treasured your advice, wisdom and guidance through the years and don’t think that will cease!  Thank you for everything!  May He continue to bless you, Carolyn your family!  Job well done! Joe Bill”

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Responses to Dr. Holly's Final Note to SETMA Staff December 21, 2018

  1. Anonymous

    We indeed did it right and did well, but only through your leadership and God’s blessing. Unfortunately, January 1st we will be without one of those for certain and most likely be without the other as well. And that will be no coincidence! It has been my honor and my privilege to have worked beside you. And I will always be ready to help you with anything. Just a call away. 

  1. Marcella Wheeler

    Dr Holly, I can’t even imagine practicing at SETMA without you as the leader. I have spent my entire career as an NP with you and I have learned so much from you. You were true to what I was told about you early on before I joined Setma, “you never sleep, and you never lie”. I’m so proud to have been a part of SETMAs history. You have set an example for all of us of what a hardworking, intelligent, respectful, supportive, kind, loving, educated, spiritual, insightful, fun, leader can be. It has been an honor to work with you and learn from you.  I will miss your contagious energy more than you know and I will continue to be the kind of provider you have taught me to be. I wish all the best for you and your wonderful wife, don’t forget us, I’ll be there in a snap in any future endeavors of yours. Marcie 

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  1. Scott Anthony 

    Dr. Holly, I have no eloquent words.  I just want you to know that I love you and Mrs. Holly and consider myself blessed by God to have worked with you.  He put me with you and it has made me better in every way.  I will miss you sorely and hope you and Mrs. Holly have all the happiness you guys deserve.  Have a Merry Christmas and a blessed new year. If you ever need anything please let me know, boss

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  1. Mr Holland’s Opus — What is the music if your life?

    Mr Holland’s Opus

    This morning I have seen the last ten minutes of this remarkable movie. For those who know the story, you will understand when I say that today it had a more personal meaning to me than it ever has.

    Do you remember the words of the former student, now the Governor?   She said:

    “Mr Holland had a profound effect on my life; on a lot of lives I know; and yet, I keep hearing he considers a great part of his own life misspent.  

    “Rumor has it that he was always working on this symphony of his. This was going to make him famous, rich, probably both.  But, Mr Holland isn’t rich and he isn’t famous, at least outside our own town. 

    “So it would be easy for him to consider himself a failure and he would be wrong because I believe he has achieved a success far beyond riches or fame. Look around you, there is not a life in this room you have not touched.  

    Each one of us is a better person because of you.  We are your symphony, Mr. Holland, we are the melody and notes of your opus and we are the music of your life.”

    I shed a few tears and then I sat about thinking, “What is the music of my life?”

    James (Larry) Holly, M.D.
    C.E.O. SETMA

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  1. Jon Sommerhauser

    And I thought Douglas McArthur gave the greatest farewell address I ever heard at West Point - Your Farewell Address to SETMA made me cry. WOW! You blessed generations  of wonderful folks in Southeast Texas. I am proud to have know you!

    Jon

  1. Presentation copy of Dr Bill Henrich’s Address at the Dr and Mrs James L. Holly Retirement Dinner, November 29, 2018







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  1. Farewell but not goodbye

    Dear Dr. Holly,

    I was not here on your last day of SETMA but I was at your party. I was so proud to watch you and Carolyn step down with such dignity and as always honoring others , each other and especially God.

    I have been so proud to say I was a member of the SETMA team. I have always treasured that I worked for a man that prayed for our company as a whole and for our team.

    As we have approached this end I have cried for sadness and also for some anxiety of what the future holds knowing we no longer had your “covering “ (the covering of God ) Feeling I am leaving Mayberry and moving to the big city.

    But then I sat back and did what I knew you would do and I had a conversation with our Heavenly Father. And knew that He is who brought me to SETMA and He will lead me through this next journey.

    So I just wanted to say until God says leave I will be His light and I will shine. I will lead by example like you have done.

    Thank you for always being a good example to follow. I bless you and and Carolyn in this next journey and I will ask that you pray for those of us that love the Lord and been called to take the baton and run this next leg of the race that you started.

    Thank you Dr Holly for all that you have done for me.  You pushed me to not doubt myself and enable me to have the means to take my registry and not give up when I didn’t pass the first time!

    You answered your phone on your time off and helped when I was scared for my brother’s heath and helped expedite his care at the hospital.

    You paid out of your own pocket for all the antibiotics for the mission trip that Marcie, Theresa and myself went on. I could go on...

    Thank you!!


    Stacy Houston Lewis RTR,RVT
    “Your favorite ultrasound tech” 😂

  2. Alicia Horn to Dr. and Mrs. Holly

    Dear Dr and Mrs Holly

    I waited until now to share with you after all the changes, I remain so thankful for the gift of you in my life. On more than one occasion you intervened ion my behalf and gave me hope.

    Your silent kindness will last in my memory forever.

    I will miss you as the leader of SETMA, but the lessons I learned from you will continue. You made an indelible mark on my life and heart.

    I wish you both the very best of everything.

    Alicia Horn

  1. Serwat Perwaiz

    This note is from a young woman we knew briefly 23 years ago as she was part of the SETMA family. She is an exceptional person, an elegant woman and very accomplished professional.  Carolyn. And I are delighted to be back in touch with her. 

    Dear Dr. Holly, You and your family left a lasting mark on my heart and mind. You all were the best part of my experience in SE Texas! I learned many things from you, which I carried forward in my life and work, such as the value of morality in the pursuit of happiness or success. The importance of giving back to the community, working on and maintaining a healthy and happy family life, with spouse and children (and grandchildren!), and love for God, self, community and country.

    I believe one reason your messages resonated with me is because they echoed the lessons I learned from my own parents and that time period in my life was my first meaningful "adult" excursion into the world, I heard my own family's values and beliefs in the conversations we shared. So, I felt at home.

    It is hard to imagine SETMA without you. You have given so much of yourself into the pursuit of a better life for all the people of Beaumont through your leadership in healthcare. And, your efforts were cutting edge! I remember on one of my visits to the office, seeing the revolutionary medical technology tools being implemented - I was impressed - but It wasn't until I left Beaumont and visited a medical office elsewhere without those tools, that I recognized how progressive your office was. Later, I briefly worked on healthcare law and, again, my experiences from your office were at the forefront of my mind and I appreciated how advanced you were and willing to take risks and try new things.

    I am thankful we are back in touch. I have enjoyed reading your posts and listening the farewell dinner addresses. I look forward to staying connected!

    Received July 22, 2019

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  1. From Serwat Perwaiz to Mrs Holly

    “Dear Mrs. Holly, I am very happy to hear all the updates! I hope I have an opportunity to meet all the children - grown up, now! I still remember them running all around Carrie's home while she and I would chat ♡ 

    “I am not surprised that your grandchildren are leading such purposeful lives! You all must be very proud of them. 

    “I was assigned to work on democracy and governance issues by the US government in Afghanistan and during that time, I worked with and interacted with many of our American military men and women. I had always been in awe of them and their commitment, but the opportunity to sit with them to strategize coordinated civilian-military efforts was one of my most exciting professional experiences!

    “I am very sorry to hear that things at SETMA have transitioned - while I know that God has a purpose and there is something good in everything that happens, even if we don't see it immediately, it is hard for me to imagine SETMA without Dr. Holly! 

    “I am not at all surprised to hear that you both have taken the situation with grace. I admire you both!”

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  1. From Serwat Perwaiz to Larry & Carolyn Holly

    I am honored that you felt my note was worthy of being shared! You and Mrs. Holly never stop to amaze me in your generosity of thought and action. 

    I will have a look at that web site and look forward to reading the document, once added.

    It would be my pleasure to meet you both, again. 

    Thank you for your prayers and I, also, pray that your lives may continue to be filled with all that is good.

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  1. Carolyn Holly’s Response to Serwat

    Oh my! I love words; I love that words can describe, yea even create beauty. Words are power, power of life and death. Dr. Holly & I can and have been described as word-smiths!!

    You words to us this morning left me speechless. Did not want to invade or diminish their treasure of beauty, life, love to our heart and soul with my words.

    You see Serwat, virtue, character, dignity of purpose and person were the trophies that we sought for with the gift of our life.

    Your words affirm us as having achieved that as reflected in the lives of others, your life

    We esteemed your person as elegant, refined brilliant, noble. I could go on... we esteemed your person.

    Your take away from what was best in us that we had to offer, validates our value of you.

    Thank you for empowering our life and future with your kindness of thought as expressed by your words.

    The Proverbs declare that out of the heart the mouth speaketh!! You have a beautiful heart.

    We can tell that you are investing your gifts to better all of humanity. We are proud of you. I know your family is, as well.

    We will share life with you through social media or however Providence allows. Till then, be well, be happy.

    We are your friends,
    Larry & Carolyn Holly

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